19-20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show (part 2)

After a seven year wait, in May 2012, it was the turn of Western Australia’s RAAF Base Pearce to host the annual Defence Force Air Show.

An estimated 50,000 spectators attended the Air Show over the weekend.

This caused some traffic problems for those who attended. Some who went to the show later in the morning were caught up in lengthy traffic jams – some people were stuck in this traffic for so long that by the time they reached the Base, the gates were closed. Poor traffic management in the base car parks at the end of each day caused problems for those trying to get away early – many people spending four hours stuck in the car park, trying to get out of the air base. Traffic problems aside, the air show contained a number of highlights.

Perhaps the most anticipated aircraft was the US Air Force Boeing B-52H Stratofortress which performed two flypasts each day, flying direct from Guam with air refuelling, and performing a practice bombing mission in the Northern Territory along the way, before returning direct to Guam.

The Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornets of the RAAF’s No.1 Squadron were also a big attraction, with one of these performing a very brief air display to open the military part of the air show.

A four-ship formation of “classic” Hornets (F/A-18A) of 75 Squadron performed some excellent close formation flying, using the name “Black Diamonds”. They also conducted a mock airfield attack, and the pyrotechnic “bomb explosion” started a small bush fire on the Saturday.

The Boeing C-17A Globemaster III of 36 Squadron performed an impressive display, including using reverse thrust from its engines to reverse on the runway, and did a three-point turn on the runway on the Sunday.

A Lockheed AP-3C Orion of 10 Squadron made a spirited display, including demonstrating its ability to loiter with an engine shut down.

The Lockheed C-130H Hercules of 37 Squadron RAAF made what is almost certainly the last air show appearance of the RAAF’s H-model Hercules at an air show on the Sunday. The
C-130H is being retired from RAAF service on 30 June 2012. A C-130J-30 of 37 Squadron was on static display.

The Republic of Singapore Air Force sent one of their recently upgraded C-130H Hercules for the static display, together with a pair of their PC-21 trainers, which are based at Pearce.

The Pearce-based PC-9/A of 2FTS with a solo air display and massed “Thunderbird” formation of 18 PC-9/A. The Hawk 127 Lead In Fighter aircraft of 79 Squadron (also based at Pearce performed a solo display, 4-ship formation display and airfield attack.

On the civilian side, the last Grumman Albatross amphibian aircraft produced was on static display, looking immaculate. This had recently been delivered to Mack McCormack, and will be based at Broome in the north of Western Australia for tourist flights.

A Rebel 300 aerobatic aircraft flown by Tony Blair (not the former British PM) gave a fantastic display of aerobatics and some very low-level passes along the runway.

RAAF PEARCE AIR SHOW AIRCRAFT LIST – CLICK HERE

RAAF PEARCE AIR SHOW PHOTOS – PART ONE

Please note: We have had to rebuild this page and photos will be re-added in coming weeks.

A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
First Boeing E-7A AEW&C (Airborne Early Warning & Control) aircraft ever built and the first of six built for the RAAF.
The Boeing E-7A AEW&C is based on Boeing BBJ (Boeing Business Jet 1), which is based on the Boeing 737-700IGW (Increased Gross Weight).
The Northrop Grumman Multi-role Electronically Scanned Array (MESA) radar is located on a fin on top of the fuselage – this is nicknamed the “top hat”. The MESA radar has a range of over 400 kilometres, and can search the air and surface, as well as controlling combat aircraft.
There are electronic countermeasures systems mounted on the nose, wingtips and tail, in addition to directed infra-red counter-measures, chaff and flares. Fins under the rear fuselage are used to counterbalance the radar. Numerous antennas can be seen along the upper and lower fuselage, including HF, VHF, UHF, Link-11, Link-16, and UHF SATCOM.
The cabin has ten operator consoles with space for two more. The aircraft has an endurance of over 10 hours.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
First Boeing E-7A AEW&C (Airborne Early Warning & Control) aircraft ever built and the first of six built for the RAAF.
The Boeing E-7A AEW&C is based on Boeing BBJ (Boeing Business Jet 1), which is based on the Boeing 737-700IGW (Increased Gross Weight).
The Northrop Grumman Multi-role Electronically Scanned Array (MESA) radar is located on a fin on top of the fuselage – this is nicknamed the “top hat”. The MESA radar has a range of over 400 kilometres, and can search the air and surface, as well as controlling combat aircraft.
There are electronic countermeasures systems mounted on the nose, wingtips and tail, in addition to directed infra-red counter-measures, chaff and flares. Fins under the rear fuselage are used to counterbalance the radar. Numerous antennas can be seen along the upper and lower fuselage, including HF, VHF, UHF, Link-11, Link-16, and UHF SATCOM.
The cabin has ten operator consoles with space for two more. The aircraft has an endurance of over 10 hours.
Photo © David Eyre
A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
First Boeing E-7A AEW&C (Airborne Early Warning & Control) aircraft ever built and the first of six built for the RAAF.
The Boeing E-7A AEW&C is based on Boeing BBJ (Boeing Business Jet 1), which is based on the Boeing 737-700IGW (Increased Gross Weight).
The Northrop Grumman Multi-role Electronically Scanned Array (MESA) radar is located on a fin on top of the fuselage – this is nicknamed the “top hat”. The MESA radar has a range of over 400 kilometres, and can search the air and surface, as well as controlling combat aircraft.
There are electronic countermeasures systems mounted on the nose, wingtips and tail, in addition to directed infra-red counter-measures, chaff and flares. Fins under the rear fuselage are used to counterbalance the radar. Numerous antennas can be seen along the upper and lower fuselage, including HF, VHF, UHF, Link-11, Link-16, and UHF SATCOM.
The cabin has ten operator consoles with space for two more. The aircraft has an endurance of over 10 hours.
Photo © David Eyre
A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A30-001 Boeing E-7A (737-7ES) Wedgetail (cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC) of RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
First Boeing E-7A AEW&C (Airborne Early Warning & Control) aircraft ever built and the first of six built for the RAAF.
The Boeing E-7A AEW&C is based on Boeing BBJ (Boeing Business Jet 1), which is based on the Boeing 737-700IGW (Increased Gross Weight).
The Northrop Grumman Multi-role Electronically Scanned Array (MESA) radar is located on a fin on top of the fuselage – this is nicknamed the “top hat”. The MESA radar has a range of over 400 kilometres, and can search the air and surface, as well as controlling combat aircraft.
There are electronic countermeasures systems mounted on the nose, wingtips and tail, in addition to directed infra-red counter-measures, chaff and flares. Fins under the rear fuselage are used to counterbalance the radar. Numerous antennas can be seen along the upper and lower fuselage, including HF, VHF, UHF, Link-11, Link-16, and UHF SATCOM.
The cabin has ten operator consoles with space for two more. The aircraft has an endurance of over 10 hours.
Photo © David Eyre
A32-339 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-339) of RAAF, 32 Sqn, East Sale, VIC, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A32-339 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-339) of RAAF, 32 Sqn, East Sale, VIC, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
“32 SQUADRON – 70 Years – ADAPTABLE SINCE 1942” logo on tail
Ex N5039E, VH-DHP.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A32-339 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-339) of RAAF, 32 Sqn, East Sale, VIC, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A32-339 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-339) of RAAF, 32 Sqn, East Sale, VIC, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
“32 SQUADRON – 70 Years – ADAPTABLE SINCE 1942” logo on tail
Ex N5039E, VH-DHP.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A32-437 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-437) of RAAF, 38 Sqn, Townsville, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A32-437 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-437) of RAAF, 38 Sqn, Townsville, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Ex N6137L, VH-YHP.
38 Squadron formerly operated the De Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou aircraft, but these were retired on 7 November 2009.
Eight King Air 350 aircraft were acquired to provide an interim capability until the delivery of ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft.
A32-437 was one of three King Air 350s which were transferred from the Australian Army’s 173rd Surveillance Squadron. It had originally been built in 2005 and delivered to the Army in April 2006. It was transferred to 38 Squadron, RAAF on 24 November 2009.
The other five King Air 350s for 38 Squadron were ordered new and delivered in 2009/10.
Photo © David Eyre
A37-001 Bombardier CL-600-2B16 Challenger 604 (cn 5521, ex N521RF) of RAAF, 34 Sqn, Fairbairn (Canberra), ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A37-001 Bombardier CL-600-2B16 Challenger 604 (cn 5521, ex N521RF) of RAAF, 34 Sqn, Fairbairn (Canberra), ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared at the show only on the Saturday as part of the static display.
It was the first of three Challenger 604 aircraft delivered to the RAAF.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A37-001 Bombardier CL-600-2B16 Challenger 604 (cn 5521, ex N521RF) of RAAF, 34 Sqn, Fairbairn (Canberra), ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A37-001 Bombardier CL-600-2B16 Challenger 604 (cn 5521, ex N521RF) of RAAF, 34 Sqn, Fairbairn (Canberra), ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared at the show only on the Saturday as part of the static display.
It was the first of three Challenger 604 aircraft delivered to the RAAF.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was the first KC-30A accepted by 33 Squadron.
The aircraft has an Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, and two underwing Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft. The KC-30 can also be refuelled in flight using its Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) above the cockpit.
The KC-30 can carry up to 111,000 kg (240,000 lb) of fuel in addition to up to 45,000 kg (99,000 lb) of cargo and up to 380 passengers.
An interesting fact about the KC-30 is that its wing did not require much modification to carry the wing-mounted refuelling pods. The A330 wing is similar to the four-engined A340, with reinforced areas and provision for fuel piping for the A340’s outer engines, so these have been used to carry the pods.
The aircraft carries a German-designed Kappa Optronics 3D day/night boom control system, consisting of seven cameras mounted under the fuselage.
A39-003 made its first flight on 24 October 2008 as F-WWYQ. Delivered initially to CASA at Madrid-Getafe, Spain on 30 November 2008, before being delivered to Brisbane Airport on 15 June 2009 for conversion by Qantas Defence Services Ltd. It made its first flight at Brisbane after conversion on 12 October 2010.
After some further conversion work in the USA and Spain, it was delivered to RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland on 30 May 2011, and was the first KC-30A accepted by the RAAF, on 1 June 2011.
On 18 November 2011, air refuelling trials with F/A-18B Hornet A21-101 were conducted by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was the first KC-30A accepted by 33 Squadron.
The aircraft has an Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, and two underwing Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft. The KC-30 can also be refuelled in flight using its Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) above the cockpit.
The KC-30 can carry up to 111,000 kg (240,000 lb) of fuel in addition to up to 45,000 kg (99,000 lb) of cargo and up to 380 passengers.
An interesting fact about the KC-30 is that its wing did not require much modification to carry the wing-mounted refuelling pods. The A330 wing is similar to the four-engined A340, with reinforced areas and provision for fuel piping for the A340’s outer engines, so these have been used to carry the pods.
The aircraft carries a German-designed Kappa Optronics 3D day/night boom control system, consisting of seven cameras mounted under the fuselage.
A39-003 made its first flight on 24 October 2008 as F-WWYQ. Delivered initially to CASA at Madrid-Getafe, Spain on 30 November 2008, before being delivered to Brisbane Airport on 15 June 2009 for conversion by Qantas Defence Services Ltd. It made its first flight at Brisbane after conversion on 12 October 2010.
After some further conversion work in the USA and Spain, it was delivered to RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland on 30 May 2011, and was the first KC-30A accepted by the RAAF, on 1 June 2011.
On 18 November 2011, air refuelling trials with F/A-18B Hornet A21-101 were conducted by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
Photo © David Eyre
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was the first KC-30A accepted by 33 Squadron.
The aircraft has an Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, and two underwing Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft. The KC-30 can also be refuelled in flight using its Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) above the cockpit.
The KC-30 can carry up to 111,000 kg (240,000 lb) of fuel in addition to up to 45,000 kg (99,000 lb) of cargo and up to 380 passengers.
An interesting fact about the KC-30 is that its wing did not require much modification to carry the wing-mounted refuelling pods. The A330 wing is similar to the four-engined A340, with reinforced areas and provision for fuel piping for the A340’s outer engines, so these have been used to carry the pods.
The aircraft carries a German-designed Kappa Optronics 3D day/night boom control system, consisting of seven cameras mounted under the fuselage.
A39-003 made its first flight on 24 October 2008 as F-WWYQ. Delivered initially to CASA at Madrid-Getafe, Spain on 30 November 2008, before being delivered to Brisbane Airport on 15 June 2009 for conversion by Qantas Defence Services Ltd. It made its first flight at Brisbane after conversion on 12 October 2010.
After some further conversion work in the USA and Spain, it was delivered to RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland on 30 May 2011, and was the first KC-30A accepted by the RAAF, on 1 June 2011.
On 18 November 2011, air refuelling trials with F/A-18B Hornet A21-101 were conducted by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
Photo © David Eyre
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was the first KC-30A accepted by 33 Squadron.
The aircraft has an Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, and two underwing Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft. The KC-30 can also be refuelled in flight using its Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) above the cockpit.
The KC-30 can carry up to 111,000 kg (240,000 lb) of fuel in addition to up to 45,000 kg (99,000 lb) of cargo and up to 380 passengers.
An interesting fact about the KC-30 is that its wing did not require much modification to carry the wing-mounted refuelling pods. The A330 wing is similar to the four-engined A340, with reinforced areas and provision for fuel piping for the A340’s outer engines, so these have been used to carry the pods.
The aircraft carries a German-designed Kappa Optronics 3D day/night boom control system, consisting of seven cameras mounted under the fuselage.
A39-003 made its first flight on 24 October 2008 as F-WWYQ. Delivered initially to CASA at Madrid-Getafe, Spain on 30 November 2008, before being delivered to Brisbane Airport on 15 June 2009 for conversion by Qantas Defence Services Ltd. It made its first flight at Brisbane after conversion on 12 October 2010.
After some further conversion work in the USA and Spain, it was delivered to RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland on 30 May 2011, and was the first KC-30A accepted by the RAAF, on 1 June 2011.
On 18 November 2011, air refuelling trials with F/A-18B Hornet A21-101 were conducted by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
Photo © David Eyre
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was the first KC-30A accepted by 33 Squadron.
The aircraft has an Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, and two underwing Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft. The KC-30 can also be refuelled in flight using its Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) above the cockpit.
The KC-30 can carry up to 111,000 kg (240,000 lb) of fuel in addition to up to 45,000 kg (99,000 lb) of cargo and up to 380 passengers.
An interesting fact about the KC-30 is that its wing did not require much modification to carry the wing-mounted refuelling pods. The A330 wing is similar to the four-engined A340, with reinforced areas and provision for fuel piping for the A340’s outer engines, so these have been used to carry the pods.
The aircraft carries a German-designed Kappa Optronics 3D day/night boom control system, consisting of seven cameras mounted under the fuselage.
A39-003 made its first flight on 24 October 2008 as F-WWYQ. Delivered initially to CASA at Madrid-Getafe, Spain on 30 November 2008, before being delivered to Brisbane Airport on 15 June 2009 for conversion by Qantas Defence Services Ltd. It made its first flight at Brisbane after conversion on 12 October 2010.
After some further conversion work in the USA and Spain, it was delivered to RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland on 30 May 2011, and was the first KC-30A accepted by the RAAF, on 1 June 2011.
On 18 November 2011, air refuelling trials with F/A-18B Hornet A21-101 were conducted by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
Photo © David Eyre
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT) (cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 ) of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was the first KC-30A accepted by 33 Squadron.
The aircraft has an Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, and two underwing Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft. The KC-30 can also be refuelled in flight using its Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) above the cockpit.
The KC-30 can carry up to 111,000 kg (240,000 lb) of fuel in addition to up to 45,000 kg (99,000 lb) of cargo and up to 380 passengers.
An interesting fact about the KC-30 is that its wing did not require much modification to carry the wing-mounted refuelling pods. The A330 wing is similar to the four-engined A340, with reinforced areas and provision for fuel piping for the A340’s outer engines, so these have been used to carry the pods.
The aircraft carries a German-designed Kappa Optronics 3D day/night boom control system, consisting of seven cameras mounted under the fuselage.
A39-003 made its first flight on 24 October 2008 as F-WWYQ. Delivered initially to CASA at Madrid-Getafe, Spain on 30 November 2008, before being delivered to Brisbane Airport on 15 June 2009 for conversion by Qantas Defence Services Ltd. It made its first flight at Brisbane after conversion on 12 October 2010.
After some further conversion work in the USA and Spain, it was delivered to RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland on 30 May 2011, and was the first KC-30A accepted by the RAAF, on 1 June 2011.
On 18 November 2011, air refuelling trials with F/A-18B Hornet A21-101 were conducted by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared in the static display, and the cargo deck was open to the public.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared in the static display, and the cargo deck was open to the public.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared in the static display, and the cargo deck was open to the public.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared in the static display, and the cargo deck was open to the public.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared in the static display, and the cargo deck was open to the public.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This aircraft appeared in the static display, and the cargo deck was open to the public.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway and then taxied back to the Ordnance Loading Area.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway and then taxied back to the Ordnance Loading Area.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway (as seen here) and then taxied back to the Ordnance Loading Area.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD & A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW & A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007: Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display. This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
A41-210: It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway and then parked at the Ordnance Loading Area (as seen here).
Photo © David Eyre
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway and then parked at the Ordnance Loading Area, as seen here.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
It took part in the flying display (as seen here), and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway and then taxied back to the Ordnance Loading Area.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway (as seen here) and then taxied back to the Ordnance Loading Area.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway (as seen here) and then taxied back to the Ordnance Loading Area.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named "City of Ipswich”, during pre-Air Show practice at RAAF Pearce - Fri 18 May 2012.
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named “City of Ipswich”, during pre-Air Show practice at RAAF Pearce – Fri 18 May 2012.
This aircraft was delivered to 1 Squadron at Amberley on 26 March 2010.
Practising for the solo air display, which was actually flown during the air show weekend by A44-210.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named "City of Ipswich”, during pre-Air Show practice at RAAF Pearce - Fri 18 May 2012.
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named “City of Ipswich”, during pre-Air Show practice at RAAF Pearce – Fri 18 May 2012.
This aircraft was delivered to 1 Squadron at Amberley on 26 March 2010.
Practising for the solo air display, which was actually flown during the air show weekend by A44-210.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named "City of Ipswich”, during pre-Air Show practice at RAAF Pearce - Fri 18 May 2012.
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named “City of Ipswich”, during pre-Air Show practice at RAAF Pearce – Fri 18 May 2012.
This aircraft was delivered to 1 Squadron at Amberley on 26 March 2010.
Practising for the solo air display, which was actually flown during the air show weekend by A44-210.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named "City of Ipswich”, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named “City of Ipswich”, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft was delivered to 1 Squadron at Amberley on 26 March 2010.
On static display.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named "City of Ipswich”, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named “City of Ipswich”, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft was delivered to 1 Squadron at Amberley on 26 March 2010.
On static display.
Photo © David Eyre
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Solo air display.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Solo air display.
Photo © Steve Jaksic
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Solo air display.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Solo air display.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Solo air display.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Solo air display.
Photo © Ian Moy
A44-215 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-15, ex 167971) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A44-215 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-15, ex 167971) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft was on static display, fitted with four AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles and two AIM-9X Sidewinder missiles.
Photo © Matt Hayes
A79-620 De Havilland DH.115 Vampire T.35 (cn 4142) of RAAF Pearce, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
A79-620 De Havilland DH.115 Vampire T.35 (cn 4142) of RAAF Pearce, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Under restoration, using tailbooms from A79-603 (cn 4124). After restoration, it will be displayed at the old gateway at RAAF Pearce with Macchi A7-027.
The Vampire is unusual in that it is constructed from wood and metal – the wooden cockpit pod can clearly be seen here. The Vampire was designed in the UK during World War Two, and the Ministry of Aircraft Production recommended the use of wood to reduce the use of aluminium, which was very precious at the time.
After the Vampires were replaced by the Macchi MB-326H from the late 1960s, A79-620 was retired and donated to the Air Cadets – initially at Claremont, WA and later at Belmont, WA. It was painted as “A79-962”.
A79-603 served with 1AFTS (Applied Flying Training School) (later renamed 2 FTS) at RAAF Base Pearce WA from 5 May 1958. It was retired on 30 June 1969, and was used as for ground instruction training. In March 1974, it was mounted on a pole outside the Officers Mess at RAAF Pearce. However, its nose section broke away when a restoration was attempted in 2001, so the cockpit from A79-620 is being joined to the tailbooms and wings of A79-603.
Photo © David Eyre
A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD & A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW & A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III (cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007: Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display. This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
A41-210: It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.
On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway and then parked at the Ordnance Loading Area (as seen here).
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 382-4787) of 37 Squadron, RAAF, named "007 - Licence to Deliver" at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 382-4787) of 37 Squadron, RAAF, named “007 – Licence to Deliver” at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday.
It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School (as seen here), then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
A97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Nose art above the forward cabin door says “007 – Licence To Deliver”. This aircraft flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.
This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model. Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia saw a C-130H at a public air display. Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service. A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce - Fri 18 May 2012
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce – Fri 18 May 2012
Arriving for the Air Show, seen here on final approach to runway 18L at 11:38.
The aircraft has shark jaws painted on the nose.
A97-441 was delivered to the RAAF in 2000, and was used in East Timor during Operation Astute in 2006.
Photo © Keith Anderson
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce - Sat 19 May 2012
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce – Sat 19 May 2012
The aircraft has shark jaws painted on the nose.
A97-441 was delivered to the RAAF in 2000, and was used in East Timor during Operation Astute in 2006.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce - Sat 19 May 2012
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce – Sat 19 May 2012
The aircraft has shark jaws painted on the nose.
A97-441 was delivered to the RAAF in 2000, and was used in East Timor during Operation Astute in 2006.
Photo © David Eyre
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce - Sat 19 May 2012
A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSW at RAAF Pearce – Sat 19 May 2012
The aircraft has shark jaws painted on the nose.
A97-441 was delivered to the RAAF in 2000, and was used in East Timor during Operation Astute in 2006.
Photo © David Eyre
N24-001 / (8)70 Sikorsky S-70B-2 Seahawk (cn 70-0461) of Royal Australian Navy, 816 Squadron, based at NAS Nowra, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
N24-001 / (8)70 Sikorsky S-70B-2 Seahawk (cn 70-0461) of Royal Australian Navy, 816 Squadron, based at NAS Nowra, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This was the first of 16 Seahawks delivered to the Royal Australian Navy. It made its maiden flight on 4 December 1987 wearing Sikorsky test registration N7265H.
Photo © Matt Hayes
N24-001 / (8)70 Sikorsky S-70B-2 Seahawk (cn 70-0461) of Royal Australian Navy, 816 Squadron, based at NAS Nowra, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
N24-001 / (8)70 Sikorsky S-70B-2 Seahawk (cn 70-0461) of Royal Australian Navy, 816 Squadron, based at NAS Nowra, NSW, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was the first of 16 Seahawks delivered to the Royal Australian Navy. It made its maiden flight on 4 December 1987 wearing Sikorsky test registration N7265H.
Photo © David Eyre
N42MY Grumman G-111 Albatross (cn G-464) owned by Mack McCormack (Bank of Utah as trustee) at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
N42MY Grumman G-111 Albatross (cn G-464) owned by Mack McCormack (Bank of Utah as trustee) at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Static display.
This was the last Grumman Albatross built.
A total of 466 Grumman Albatross aircraft were built between 1947 and 1961.
N42MY was built as a military Grumman UF-2 under the Military Aid Program (MAP), as the last of six ordered for the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF). For contractual purposes, it was allocated US Navy serial number 148329.
It was delivered to the JMSDF on 5 May 1961, and allocated the JMSDF serial number 9056 – it also wore the US Navy serial 148329 on the rear fuselage. After 1962, it was re-designated as a Grumman HU-16D Albatross. See photo of the aircraft with the JMSDF in 1976: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2770.jpg
In the late 1970s/early 1980s, Grumman bought 57 ex-military Albatrosses for conversion to civil G-111 Albatross configuration, certified to conduct airline and charter operations.
Around 1980, 9056/148329 was sold and registered N88999 – see 1980s photo: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2831.jpg .
In 1981, it was rebuilt by Grumman as a civilian G-111 Albatross, at a cost of US$1.2 million. Although Grumman thought that there was a market for 200 G-111s, only 13 were converted – 12 for Resorts International and one (this aircraft) for Conoco Oil/ Pelita Air Service. It can seat 23 but is certified to carry up to 28 people.
The aircraft was registered in Indonesia as PK-PAM with Pelita Air Service, flying on behalf of the Conoco oil company. It was based in Singapore, and used in support of offshore drilling in a 28-seat configuration.
On 6 March 1992, the aircraft was registered N26PR to Paragon Ranch, Broomfield, Colorado. By 1996, N26PR was owned by Mirabella Yachts Inc, Palm Beach, Florida – Sep 1996 photo: http://www.abpic.co.uk/photo/1064553/
On 8 December 1997, Mirabella Yachts reregistered the aircraft as N42MY. It was based at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Florida and at Fort Pierce Airport, Florida. Here is a 2003 photo: http://www.airliners.net/photo/Grumman-G-111-Albatross/0457395/L/&sid=aac86aa3f09e8f84dbe6e378e17e8e90
On 21 January 2009, N42MY was registered to Sherman Aircraft Sales and advertised for sale – initially at $995,000, and later at US$795,000, based at West Palm Beach Airport, Florida, with a total of 4,433 flying hours.
In March 2012, N42MY was acquired by Australian businessman Mack McCormack, but registered to the Bank of Utah as trustee.
It was flown to Salt Lake City, Utah, for inspections and repainting. It then flew to North County Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida and on 25 March 2012, it flew to the Port of Palm Beach at Lake Worth Inlet to be loaded onto the ship MV Suomigracht for transport to Australia. Photos of N42MY being loaded aboard: http://www.superyacht-australia.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Sevenstar.png ).
It was shipped to Newcastle, NSW, arriving on 20 April 2012, and was flown to Newcastle Airport.
On 23 April 2012, the aircraft flew from Bankstown to Sydney Harbour, where it landed and water-taxied past the Opera House to the former flying boat base at Rose Bay, before taking off again and returning to Bankstown.
On 25-26 April 2012, it flew across to Perth Airport. On 27 April 2012, N42MY took off from Perth Airport, flew along the Swan River, and ten minutes later landed and took off in Matilda Bay. Matilda Bay was once the base for US Navy and RAAF Catalina flying boats during World War Two. N42MY then flew to Rottnest Island and landed in Thompson Bay, then took off and flew to RAAF Base Pearce.
Mr McCormack plans to base the Albatross in Broome and use the aircraft to fly tourist and charter flights in and around the Kimberley region of Western Australia, including the Horizontal Waterfalls, Montgomery Reef, Prince Region and off the coast at Rowley Shoals.
Photos and history © David Eyre
N42MY Grumman G-111 Albatross (cn G-464) owned by Mack McCormack (Bank of Utah as trustee) at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
N42MY Grumman G-111 Albatross (cn G-464) owned by Mack McCormack (Bank of Utah as trustee) at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Static display.
This was the last Grumman Albatross built.
A total of 466 Grumman Albatross aircraft were built between 1947 and 1961.
N42MY was built as a military Grumman UF-2 under the Military Aid Program (MAP), as the last of six ordered for the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF). For contractual purposes, it was allocated US Navy serial number 148329.
It was delivered to the JMSDF on 5 May 1961, and allocated the JMSDF serial number 9056 – it also wore the US Navy serial 148329 on the rear fuselage. After 1962, it was re-designated as a Grumman HU-16D Albatross. See photo of the aircraft with the JMSDF in 1976: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2770.jpg
In the late 1970s/early 1980s, Grumman bought 57 ex-military Albatrosses for conversion to civil G-111 Albatross configuration, certified to conduct airline and charter operations.
Around 1980, 9056/148329 was sold and registered N88999 – see 1980s photo: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2831.jpg .
In 1981, it was rebuilt by Grumman as a civilian G-111 Albatross, at a cost of US$1.2 million. Although Grumman thought that there was a market for 200 G-111s, only 13 were converted – 12 for Resorts International and one (this aircraft) for Conoco Oil/ Pelita Air Service. It can seat 23 but is certified to carry up to 28 people.
The aircraft was registered in Indonesia as PK-PAM with Pelita Air Service, flying on behalf of the Conoco oil company. It was based in Singapore, and used in support of offshore drilling in a 28-seat configuration.
On 6 March 1992, the aircraft was registered N26PR to Paragon Ranch, Broomfield, Colorado. By 1996, N26PR was owned by Mirabella Yachts Inc, Palm Beach, Florida – Sep 1996 photo: http://www.abpic.co.uk/photo/1064553/
On 8 December 1997, Mirabella Yachts reregistered the aircraft as N42MY. It was based at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Florida and at Fort Pierce Airport, Florida. Here is a 2003 photo: http://www.airliners.net/photo/Grumman-G-111-Albatross/0457395/L/&sid=aac86aa3f09e8f84dbe6e378e17e8e90
On 21 January 2009, N42MY was registered to Sherman Aircraft Sales and advertised for sale – initially at $995,000, and later at US$795,000, based at West Palm Beach Airport, Florida, with a total of 4,433 flying hours.
In March 2012, N42MY was acquired by Australian businessman Mack McCormack, but registered to the Bank of Utah as trustee.
It was flown to Salt Lake City, Utah, for inspections and repainting. It then flew to North County Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida and on 25 March 2012, it flew to the Port of Palm Beach at Lake Worth Inlet to be loaded onto the ship MV Suomigracht for transport to Australia. Photos of N42MY being loaded aboard: http://www.superyacht-australia.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Sevenstar.png ).
It was shipped to Newcastle, NSW, arriving on 20 April 2012, and was flown to Newcastle Airport.
On 23 April 2012, the aircraft flew from Bankstown to Sydney Harbour, where it landed and water-taxied past the Opera House to the former flying boat base at Rose Bay, before taking off again and returning to Bankstown.
On 25-26 April 2012, it flew across to Perth Airport. On 27 April 2012, N42MY took off from Perth Airport, flew along the Swan River, and ten minutes later landed and took off in Matilda Bay. Matilda Bay was once the base for US Navy and RAAF Catalina flying boats during World War Two. N42MY then flew to Rottnest Island and landed in Thompson Bay, then took off and flew to RAAF Base Pearce.
Mr McCormack plans to base the Albatross in Broome and use the aircraft to fly tourist and charter flights in and around the Kimberley region of Western Australia, including the Horizontal Waterfalls, Montgomery Reef, Prince Region and off the coast at Rowley Shoals.
Photos and history © David Eyre
N42MY Grumman G-111 Albatross (cn G-464) owned by Mack McCormack (Bank of Utah as trustee) at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
N42MY Grumman G-111 Albatross (cn G-464) owned by Mack McCormack (Bank of Utah as trustee) at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Static display.
This was the last Grumman Albatross built.
A total of 466 Grumman Albatross aircraft were built between 1947 and 1961.
N42MY was built as a military Grumman UF-2 under the Military Aid Program (MAP), as the last of six ordered for the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF). For contractual purposes, it was allocated US Navy serial number 148329.
It was delivered to the JMSDF on 5 May 1961, and allocated the JMSDF serial number 9056 – it also wore the US Navy serial 148329 on the rear fuselage. After 1962, it was re-designated as a Grumman HU-16D Albatross. See photo of the aircraft with the JMSDF in 1976: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2770.jpg
In the late 1970s/early 1980s, Grumman bought 57 ex-military Albatrosses for conversion to civil G-111 Albatross configuration, certified to conduct airline and charter operations.
Around 1980, 9056/148329 was sold and registered N88999 – see 1980s photo: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2831.jpg .
In 1981, it was rebuilt by Grumman as a civilian G-111 Albatross, at a cost of US$1.2 million. Although Grumman thought that there was a market for 200 G-111s, only 13 were converted – 12 for Resorts International and one (this aircraft) for Conoco Oil/ Pelita Air Service. It can seat 23 but is certified to carry up to 28 people.
The aircraft was registered in Indonesia as PK-PAM with Pelita Air Service, flying on behalf of the Conoco oil company. It was based in Singapore, and used in support of offshore drilling in a 28-seat configuration.
On 6 March 1992, the aircraft was registered N26PR to Paragon Ranch, Broomfield, Colorado. By 1996, N26PR was owned by Mirabella Yachts Inc, Palm Beach, Florida – Sep 1996 photo: http://www.abpic.co.uk/photo/1064553/
On 8 December 1997, Mirabella Yachts reregistered the aircraft as N42MY. It was based at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Florida and at Fort Pierce Airport, Florida. Here is a 2003 photo: http://www.airliners.net/photo/Grumman-G-111-Albatross/0457395/L/&sid=aac86aa3f09e8f84dbe6e378e17e8e90
On 21 January 2009, N42MY was registered to Sherman Aircraft Sales and advertised for sale – initially at $995,000, and later at US$795,000, based at West Palm Beach Airport, Florida, with a total of 4,433 flying hours.
In March 2012, N42MY was acquired by Australian businessman Mack McCormack, but registered to the Bank of Utah as trustee.
It was flown to Salt Lake City, Utah, for inspections and repainting. It then flew to North County Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida and on 25 March 2012, it flew to the Port of Palm Beach at Lake Worth Inlet to be loaded onto the ship MV Suomigracht for transport to Australia. Photos of N42MY being loaded aboard: http://www.superyacht-australia.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Sevenstar.png ).
It was shipped to Newcastle, NSW, arriving on 20 April 2012, and was flown to Newcastle Airport.
On 23 April 2012, the aircraft flew from Bankstown to Sydney Harbour, where it landed and water-taxied past the Opera House to the former flying boat base at Rose Bay, before taking off again and returning to Bankstown.
On 25-26 April 2012, it flew across to Perth Airport. On 27 April 2012, N42MY took off from Perth Airport, flew along the Swan River, and ten minutes later landed and took off in Matilda Bay. Matilda Bay was once the base for US Navy and RAAF Catalina flying boats during World War Two. N42MY then flew to Rottnest Island and landed in Thompson Bay, then took off and flew to RAAF Base Pearce.
Mr McCormack plans to base the Albatross in Broome and use the aircraft to fly tourist and charter flights in and around the Kimberley region of Western Australia, including the Horizontal Waterfalls, Montgomery Reef, Prince Region and off the coast at Rowley Shoals.
Photos and history © David Eyre
VH-BQO Christen Eagle II (cn V81) owned by Eagle Magic Pty Ltd & VH-MRI Victa Airtourer 115 (cn 158) owned by Susan Clarke at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-BQO Christen Eagle II (cn V81) owned by Eagle Magic Pty Ltd & VH-MRI Victa Airtourer 115 (cn 158) owned by Susan Clarke at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
These aircraft performed an aerobatic and formation flying display, including this opposition pass.
Photo © Michael Foss
VH-CTP Flight Design CTLS (cn F-08-05-16) owned by Basilio Lenzo at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-CTP Flight Design CTLS (cn F-08-05-16) owned by Basilio Lenzo at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
These aircraft are designed and built in Germany. CTLS stands for Composite Technology Light Sport.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-DGZ Glaser-Dirks DG-1000S glider (cn 10-92S65) owned by Beverley Soaring Society Inc, Beverley, WA, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-DGZ Glaser-Dirks DG-1000S glider (cn 10-92S65) owned by Beverley Soaring Society Inc, Beverley, WA, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was brought in by road for static display.
The DG-1000S is a German two-seat glider with 20-metre wing span, certified for limited aerobatics (+5 to -2.65 Gs).
Photo © David Eyre
VH-DPV / 038 NZAI CT/4A Airtrainer (cn 038) owned by Brian Collingridge at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-DPV / 038 NZAI CT/4A Airtrainer (cn 038) owned by Brian Collingridge at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This aircraft was delivered to the RAAF on 4 June 1975, using ferry registration ZK-EAA. It was allocated RAAF serial A19-038. It was sold on 21 June 1993 and registered VH-DPV, but has retained its RAAF “Fanta can” paint scheme, which also led to the type being nicknamed the “Plastic Parrot”.
The CT/4 was developed in 1972 by New Zealand Aerospace Industries from the Australian-designed and built Victa Aircruiser, which was based on the 1960s Victa Airtourer. Ironically, in 1967 Victa had to sell the manufacturing rights to AESL (later NZAI) in New Zealand due to lack of Australian Government support. Then in 1975, the RAAF ordered 51 CT/4A aircraft as a primary trainer.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-FID Beech D18S (cn A-458) owned by Adamson Holdings Pty Ltd, Geraldton, WA, named "Dinky Di", at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-FID Beech D18S (cn A-458) owned by Adamson Holdings Pty Ltd, Geraldton, WA, named “Dinky Di”, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Although it wears RAAF blue/white WW2 style-roundels, it never served with the military.
Built in 1948, ex N628B. This aircraft was imported into Australia in 1961 by Flinders Island Airlines (hence the ‘FI’ in the registration), to replace their aging Avro Ansons.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012. Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Landing at 9.06am – it was on static display both Saturday and Sunday.
This Brazilian designed and built jet is used to train airline pilots for China Southern Airlines, and was delivered on 18 January 2012.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
It was on static display both Saturday and Sunday.
This Brazilian designed and built jet is used to train airline pilots for China Southern Airlines, and was delivered on 18 January 2012.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
It was on static display both Saturday and Sunday.
This Brazilian designed and built jet is used to train airline pilots for China Southern Airlines, and was delivered on 18 January 2012.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237, ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
It was on static display both Saturday and Sunday.
This Brazilian designed and built jet is used to train airline pilots for China Southern Airlines, and was delivered on 18 January 2012.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-INT Cessna 550 Citation II (cn 550-0102) of Revesco Aviation, based at Perth Airport - Sat 19 May 2012. Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-INT Cessna 550 Citation II (cn 550-0102) of Revesco Aviation, based at Perth Airport – Sat 19 May 2012.
Landing at 09:55.
Ex N2664Y, VH-WNP, VH-JCG, VH-JPG, VH-OYC
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-KEB Eurocopter AS350B2 Squirrel (cn 4805) of Heliwest (Power Capital Holdings Pty Ltd) at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012. Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-KEB Eurocopter AS350B2 Squirrel (cn 4805) of Heliwest (Power Capital Holdings Pty Ltd) at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This conducted joyflights.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-LHP Bell 206L-3 LongRanger III (cn 51002) owned by Heliwest (Helibits Pty Ltd) at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012. Photo © David Eyre
VH-LHP Bell 206L-3 LongRanger III (cn 51002) owned by Heliwest (Helibits Pty Ltd) at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
It carries “Rescue” titles as it was the backup helicopter for Surf Life Saving WA, used on beach patrols.
This helicopter conducted joyflights.
Ex N1084D, G-LIII, G-CJCB.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-LHY Sikorsky S-76A+ (cn 760105) of CHC Helicopters / operated for the RAAF as a rescue helicopter, based at Pearce, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012. Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-LHY Sikorsky S-76A+ (cn 760105) of CHC Helicopters / operated for the RAAF as a rescue helicopter, based at Pearce, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Ex 729 (Royal Jordanian Air Force), ABLE-9.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-LHY Sikorsky S-76A+ (cn 760105) of CHC Helicopters / operated for the RAAF as a rescue helicopter, based at Pearce, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-LHY Sikorsky S-76A+ (cn 760105) of CHC Helicopters / operated for the RAAF as a rescue helicopter, based at Pearce, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Ex 729 (Royal Jordanian Air Force), ABLE-9.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-LQD Bombardier DHC-8-402 Dash 8Q-400 (cn 4371) of QantasLink at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-LQD Bombardier DHC-8-402 Dash 8Q-400 (cn 4371) of QantasLink at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Landing on runway 36R after a short hop from Perth Airport – a flight chartered by aircraft enthusiasts.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-LVD Kavanagh B-105 (hot air balloon) (cn B105-430), owned by the RAAF, based in Canberra, ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-LVD Kavanagh B-105 (hot air balloon) (cn B105-430), owned by the RAAF, based in Canberra, ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This hot air balloon was brought over to WA to help promote the air show, and flew over the city of Perth on Thursday morning (17 May 2012). It then made the news on Thursday evening when it landed in suburban street in the northern Perth suburb of Carine. It performed a tethered flight on the Sunday of the air show.
Kavanagh Balloons has been Australia’s only manufacturer of hot air balloons, since 1979. The Kavanagh B-105 has an envelope capacity of 105,000 cubic feet (2,970m³), and can carry up to six people in the basket, including the pilot.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-LVD Kavanagh B-105 (hot air balloon) (cn B105-430), owned by the RAAF, based in Canberra, ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-LVD Kavanagh B-105 (hot air balloon) (cn B105-430), owned by the RAAF, based in Canberra, ACT, at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This hot air balloon was brought over to WA to help promote the air show, and flew over the city of Perth on Thursday morning (17 May 2012). It then made the news on Thursday evening when it landed in suburban street in the northern Perth suburb of Carine. It performed a tethered flight on the Sunday of the air show.
Kavanagh Balloons has been Australia’s only manufacturer of hot air balloons, since 1979. The Kavanagh B-105 has an envelope capacity of 105,000 cubic feet (2,970m³), and can carry up to six people in the basket, including the pilot.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-MAN / 232003 / 85 Nanchang CJ-6A (cn 232003), owned by S & K Investments Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-MAN / 232003 / 85 Nanchang CJ-6A (cn 232003), owned by S & K Investments Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This was on static display on the Sunday.
It wears Chinese Air Force (PLAAF) markings, having been formerly owned by them, and was built in 1962.
The CJ-6 is a Chinese version of the Russian-designed Yakovlev Yak-18A.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-NNV Nanchang CJ-6A (cn 5432024) of Fighter Combat International at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-NNV Nanchang CJ-6A (cn 5432024) of Fighter Combat International at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Landing after performing a formation aerobatic display.
Built in 1992, ex 5432024 PLAAF.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-AYU / 4532020 (cn 4532020, ex 4532020 PLAAF), VH-FCE (cn 3932014, ex 3932014 PLAAF, VH-NNO), VH-NNV (cn 5432024, ex 5432024 PLAAF) Nanchang CJ-6A aircraft of Fighter Combat International at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-AYU / 4532020 (cn 4532020, ex 4532020 PLAAF), VH-FCE (cn 3932014, ex 3932014 PLAAF, VH-NNO), VH-NNV (cn 5432024, ex 5432024 PLAAF) Nanchang CJ-6A aircraft of Fighter Combat International at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Formation aerobatic display.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-NNV (cn 5432024, ex 5432024 PLAAF) & VH-FCE (cn 3932014, ex 3932014 PLAAF, VH-NNO) Nanchang CJ-6A aircraft of Fighter Combat International at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-NNV (cn 5432024, ex 5432024 PLAAF) & VH-FCE (cn 3932014, ex 3932014 PLAAF, VH-NNO) Nanchang CJ-6A aircraft of Fighter Combat International at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Taking off for their formation aerobatic display.
Photo © Keith Anderson
VH-VOA Beech 1900C (cn UB-62) of Ad Astral Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-VOA Beech 1900C (cn UB-62) of Ad Astral Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Landing on runway 36R – it was parked in the static park for Saturday only.
Ex N29995, N819BE, VH-IYP, ZS-NAV
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-NOA Beech 1900D (cn UE-94) of Ad Astral Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-NOA Beech 1900D (cn UE-94) of Ad Astral Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Landing on runway 36R – it was parked in the static park for Saturday only.
Ex N94UX, N94GL, ZS-PPX, PK-OCW
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-NTJ / "A85-443" CAC CA-25 Winjeel (cn 25-7) of Tang Holdings Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-NTJ / “A85-443” CAC CA-25 Winjeel (cn 25-7) of Tang Holdings Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft was in the air display and static display both air show days.
Built in 1955. Although painted as “A85-443”, its real RAAF serial was A85-407.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-PVA Vans RV-7A (cn 71019) owned by Peter Poland, named "Carmella" at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-PVA Vans RV-7A (cn 71019) owned by Peter Poland, named “Carmella” at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Ex N593B.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-SBO Seabird Seeker ER SB7L-360A (cn 070011) of Dunkel Aviation Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-SBO Seabird Seeker ER SB7L-360A (cn 070011) of Dunkel Aviation Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Static display – Sunday only.
The Seabird Seeker is an Australian-designed observation aircraft built by Seabird Aviation Australia Pty Ltd of Australia and Seabird Aviation Jordan.
Appearing like a helicopter cockpit grafted onto the front of an aeroplane, the Seeker is designed as a low-cost alternative to helicopters.
Photos © David Eyre
VH-SBO Seabird Seeker ER SB7L-360A (cn 070011) of Dunkel Aviation Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-SBO Seabird Seeker ER SB7L-360A (cn 070011) of Dunkel Aviation Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Static display – Sunday only.
The Seabird Seeker is an Australian-designed observation aircraft built by Seabird Aviation Australia Pty Ltd of Australia and Seabird Aviation Jordan.
Appearing like a helicopter cockpit grafted onto the front of an aeroplane, the Seeker is designed as a low-cost alternative to helicopters.
Photos © David Eyre
VH-TBN Rebel 300 (cn S8-88-008) of Tony Blair, Tamworth, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-TBN Rebel 300 (cn S8-88-008) of Tony Blair, Tamworth, NSW at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This pilot performed a fantastic aerobatic display.
Built in 1998. Ex N540U
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-URC Boeing A75N1 Stearman (PT-17 Kaydet) (cn 75-1834) of Heckenbury Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-URC Boeing A75N1 Stearman (PT-17 Kaydet) (cn 75-1834) of Heckenbury Pty Ltd at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Static display – Sunday only. Wears a WW2-style US Army Air Corps blue/yellow colour scheme.
Built in 1941. Ex 41-8275, N58403.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-WPF Gippsland Aeronautics GA-8 Airvan (cn GA8-12-176) of the WA Police Air Wing at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-WPF Gippsland Aeronautics GA-8 Airvan (cn GA8-12-176) of the WA Police Air Wing at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft had only just joined the WA Police, and is new – it was registered on 4 May 2012, just two weeks prior to this photo.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-WWA / A - 106 North American AT-6D Texan (cn 78-7094) of Adrian Thomas at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-WWA / A – 106 North American AT-6D Texan (cn 78-7094) of Adrian Thomas at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
Performed in the air display both days.
Built in 1942. Ex 41-16716, 0106 (Paraguayan Air Force), N6069H.
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-XKI De Havilland Canada DHC-8-315Q Dash 8Q-300 (cn 587) of Skippers Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sat 19 May 2012.
VH-XKI De Havilland Canada DHC-8-315Q Dash 8Q-300 (cn 587) of Skippers Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sat 19 May 2012.
This aircraft flew in on Saturday and Sunday from its base at Perth Airport, and was part of the static display.
Ex C-GDIU, EC-IIA, C-GKUX
Photo © Matt Hayes
VH-XKI De Havilland Canada DHC-8-315Q Dash 8Q-300 (cn 587) of Skippers Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-XKI De Havilland Canada DHC-8-315Q Dash 8Q-300 (cn 587) of Skippers Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This aircraft flew in on Saturday and Sunday from its base at Perth Airport, and was part of the static display.
Ex C-GDIU, EC-IIA, C-GKUX
Photo © David Eyre
VH-XKI De Havilland Canada DHC-8-315Q Dash 8Q-300 (cn 587) of Skippers Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
VH-XKI De Havilland Canada DHC-8-315Q Dash 8Q-300 (cn 587) of Skippers Aviation at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
This aircraft flew in on Saturday and Sunday from its base at Perth Airport, and was part of the static display.
Ex C-GDIU, EC-IIA, C-GKUX
Photo © David Eyre
Sunset at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
Time to go home….Sunset at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
A sunset view from the southern car park, where many spectators were stuck trying to get off the RAAF Base.
Photo © Keith Anderson
Traffic jams at RAAF Pearce Air Show - Sun 20 May 2012.
Traffic jams at RAAF Pearce Air Show – Sun 20 May 2012.
Poor traffic management in the car parks on the base was a major let down for many air show attendees.
Despite trying to leave early (40 minutes before the end of the flying display) we were directed away from the exit, but others who left much later were allowed to head straight for the exit and jump the queue. Adding to this, aircraft were moved along the taxiway between the car park and the exit, frequently stopping the car traffic flow (as seen here at 5:40pm).
It took us nearly 4 hours just to get out of the air base perimeter.
Photo © David Eyre

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A30-001 Boeing 737-7ES Wedgetail
(cn 33474/1245, ex N378BC)
RAAF, 2 Sqn, Williamtown, NSW
First Boeing 737 AEW&C (Airborne Early Warning & Control) aircraft ever built and the first of six built for the RAAF.The Boeing 737 AEW&C is based on Boeing BBJ (Boeing Business Jet 1), which is based on the Boeing 737-700IGW (Increased Gross Weight).The Northrop Grumman Multi-role Electronically Scanned Array (MESA) radar is located on a fin on top of the fuselage – this is nicknamed the “top hat”. The MESA radar has a range of over 400 kilometres, and can search the air and surface, as well as controlling combat aircraft.There are electronic countermeasures systems mounted on the nose, wingtips and tail, in addition to directed infra-red counter-measures, chaff and flares. Fins under the rear fuselage are used to counterbalance the radar. Numerous antennas can be seen along the upper and lower fuselage, including HF, VHF, UHF, Link-11, Link-16, and UHF SATCOM.The cabin has ten operator consoles with space for two more. The aircraft has an endurance of over 10 hours.Photo 1 © Keith AndersonPhotos 2 – 4 © David Eyre
Sat 19 & Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show A32-339 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-339) of RAAF, 32 Sqn, East Sale, VIC“32 SQUADRON – 70 Years – ADAPTABLE SINCE 1942″ logo on tail
Ex N5039E, VH-DHP.Photo 1: Sat 19 May © Matt HayesPhoto 2: Sun 20 May © Keith Anderson
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show A32-437 Beech B300 King Air 350 (cn FL-437) of RAAF, 38 Sqn, Townsville, QLDEx N6137L, VH-YHP.38 Squadron formerly operated the De Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou aircraft, but these were retired on 7 November 2009.Eight King Air 350 aircraft were acquired to provide an interim capability until the delivery of ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft.A32-437 was one of three King Air 350s which were transferred from the Australian Army’s 173rd Surveillance Squadron. It had originally been built in 2005 and delivered to the Army in April 2006. It was transferred to 38 Squadron, RAAF on 24 November 2009.The other five King Air 350s for 38 Squadron were ordered new and delivered in 2009/10.Photo © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A37-001 Bombardier CL-600-2B16 Challenger 604 (cn 5521, ex N521RF) of RAAF, 34 Sqn, Fairbairn (Canberra), ACT.This aircraft appeared at the show only on the Saturday as part of the static display.It was the first of three Challenger 604 aircraft delivered to the RAAF.Photo 1 © Matt HayesPhoto 2 © Keith Anderson
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show A39-003 Airbus KC-30A (A330-200 MRTT)
(cn 969 ex F-WWYQ, EC-334 )
of RAAF, 33 Sqn, Amberley, QLD
This was the first KC-30A accepted by 33 Squadron.The aircraft has an Airbus Military Aerial Refuelling Boom System (ARBS) for receptacle-equipped receiver aircraft, and two underwing Cobham 905E under-wing refuelling pods for probe-equipped receiver aircraft. The KC-30 can also be refuelled in flight using its Universal Aerial Refuelling Receptacle System Installation (UARRSI) above the cockpit.The KC-30 can carry up to 111,000 kg (240,000 lb) of fuel in addition to up to 45,000 kg (99,000 lb) of cargo and up to 380 passengers.An interesting fact about the KC-30 is that its wing did not require much modification to carry the wing-mounted refuelling pods. The A330 wing is similar to the four-engined A340, with reinforced areas and provision for fuel piping for the A340’s outer engines, so these have been used to carry the pods.The aircraft carries a German-designed Kappa Optronics 3D day/night boom control system, consisting of seven cameras mounted under the fuselage.A39-003 made its first flight on 24 October 2008 as F-WWYQ. Delivered initially to CASA at Madrid-Getafe, Spain on 30 November 2008, before being delivered to Brisbane Airport on 15 June 2009 for conversion by Qantas Defence Services Ltd. It made its first flight at Brisbane after conversion on 12 October 2010.After some further conversion work in the USA and Spain, it was delivered to RAAF Base Amberley in Queensland on 30 May 2011, and was the first KC-30A accepted by the RAAF, on 1 June 2011.On 18 November 2011, air refuelling trials with F/A-18B Hornet A21-101 were conducted by the Aircraft Research and Development Unit.Photo 1 © Keith AndersonPhotos 2 – 6 © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A41-207 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III
(cn F-173/AUS2, ex 06-0207) of
RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD
.This aircraft appeared in the static display, and the cargo deck was open to the public.Photo 1 © David EyrePhoto 2 © Matt HayesPhotos 3 – 6 © David Eyre
19 & 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A41-210 Boeing C-17A Globemaster III
(cn F-239/AUS5, ex 11-0210) of
RAAF, 36 Sqn, based at Amberley, QLD
.This aircraft was parked at the Ordnance Loading Apron (OLA), which is also used for transient visiting aircraft.It took part in the flying display, and demonstrated its ability to reverse on the runway using reverse thrust from the engines. During this reversing, the Loadmaster sat on the rear loading ramp, providing guidance by intercom.On Sunday, the aircraft did a three point turn on the runway and then taxied back to the OLA.Photos 1 – 3 © Matt HayesPhotos 4 – 7 © David EyrePhoto 8 © Keith Anderson
Fri 18 May 2012: RAAF Pearce – Pre-show practice &Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A44-202 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-2, ex 167958) of RAAF, 1 Sqn, Amberley, QLD, named “City of Ipswich”.
This aircraft was delivered to 1 Squadron at Amberley on 26 March 2010.Photos 1 – 3: © Keith Anderson – 18 May 2012 : Practising for the solo air display, which was actually flown during the air show weekend by A44-210.Photo 4 © Matt Hayes 19 May 2012: static displayPhoto 5 © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A44-210 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-10, ex 167966) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland.Photo 1: 19 May 2012: Taking off from runway 36R.
© Matt Hayes
Photo 2: 19 May 2012 Taking off from runway 36R.
© Steve Jaksic
Photo 3: 20 May 2012 Air display © Keith AndersonPhoto 4: 19 May 2012 Air display © Matt HayesPhoto 5: 19 May 2012 Taxying in after its display.
© Ian Moy
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A44-215 Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet (cn AF-15, ex 167971) of RAAF, 1 Squadron, Amberley, Queensland.This aircraft was on static display, fitted with four AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles and two AIM-9X Sidewinder missiles.Photo © Matt Hayes
19 & 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air ShowA79-620 De Havilland DH.115 Vampire T.35 (cn 4142) of RAAF PearceUnder restoration, using tailbooms from A79-603 (cn 4124). After restoration, it will be displayed at the old gateway at RAAF Pearce with Macchi A7-027.The Vampire is unusual in that it is constructed from wood and metal – the wooden cockpit pod can clearly be seen here. The Vampire was designed in the UK during World War Two, and the Ministry of Aircraft Production recommended the use of wood to reduce the use of aluminium, which was very precious at the time.After the Vampires were replaced by the Macchi MB-326H from the late 1960s, A79-620 was retired and donated to the Air Cadets – initially at Claremont, WA and later at Belmont, WA. It was painted as “A79-962”.A79-603 served with 1AFTS (Applied Flying Training School) (later renamed 2 FTS) at RAAF Base Pearce WA from 5 May 1958. It was retired on 30 June 1969, and was used as for ground instruction training. In March 1974, it was mounted on a pole outside the Officers Mess at RAAF Pearce. However, its nose section broke away when a restoration was attempted in 2001, so the cockpit from A79-620 is being joined to the tailbooms and wings of
A79-603.Photo © David Eyre
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air ShowA97-007 Lockheed C-130H Hercules (cn 4787) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSWNose art above the forward cabin door says
“007 – Licence To Deliver”This flew on Sunday only, apparently due to being unserviceable on the Saturday. It did a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop of eight skydivers from Army Parachute School, then did an air display.This aircraft was the seventh of 12 C-130H Hercules ordered by the RAAF to replace the old C-130A model.Four C-130H have already been retired. It was recently announced that as part of defence budget cuts, the other eight C-130H will be retired by 30 June 2012, so this is the last time that Western Australia will see the C-130H at a public air display.Previously the Government was looking to retire the C-130H in 2013, but in October 2011 was examining whether to retain this model until 2016, when the ten new Alenia C-27J Spartan aircraft enter service.A97-007 was delivered to the RAAF in September 1978, and served with 36 Squadron at Richmond, NSW until 17/11/2006, when it was transferred to 37 Squadron.Photos 1 – 4 © David EyrePhotos 5 & 6 © Keith AndersonPhotos 7 – 11 © David Eyre
Fri 18 May 2012: RAAF Pearce – Pre-show arrival &
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012A97-441 Lockheed-Martin C-130J-30 Hercules (cn 5441) of RAAF, 37 Sqn, Richmond, NSWNote that the aircraft has shark jaws painted on the nose.A97-441 was delivered to the RAAF in 2000, and was used in East Timor during Operation Astute in 2006.Photo 1 © Keith Anderson – taken on 18 May 2012, on final approach to runway 18L at Pearce at 11:38Photos 2 – 4 © David Eyre – taken on 19 May 2012
19 & 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012N24-001 / (8)70 Sikorsky S-70B-2 Seahawk (cn 70-0461) of Royal Australian Navy, 816 Squadron, based at NAS Nowra, NSW.This was the first of 16 Seahawks delivered to the Royal Australian Navy. It made its maiden flight on 4 December 1987 wearing Sikorsky test registration N7265H.Photo 1 © Matt HayesPhoto 2 © David Eyre
19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012N42MY Grumman G-111 Albatross (cn G-464) owned by Mack McCormack (Bank of Utah as trustee) Static displayThis was the last Grumman Albatross built.A total of 466 Grumman Albatross aircraft were built between 1947 and 1961.N42MY was built as a military Grumman UF-2 under the Military Aid Program (MAP), as the last of six ordered for the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF). For contractual purposes, it was allocated US Navy serial number 148329.It was delivered to the JMSDF on 5 May 1961, and allocated the JMSDF serial number 9056 – it also wore the US Navy serial 148329 on the rear fuselage. After 1962, it was re-designated as a Grumman HU-16D Albatross. See photo of the aircraft with the JMSDF in 1976: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2770.jpgIn the late 1970s/early 1980s, Grumman bought 57 ex-military Albatrosses for conversion to civil G-111 Albatross configuration, certified to conduct airline and charter operations.Around 1980, 9056/148329 was sold and registered N88999 – see 1980s photo: http://www.gonavy.jp/bbs1/img/2831.jpg .In 1981, it was rebuilt by Grumman as a civilian G-111 Albatross, at a cost of US$1.2 million. Although Grumman thought that there was a market for 200 G-111s, only 13 were converted – 12 for Resorts International and one (this aircraft) for Conoco Oil/ Pelita Air Service. It can seat 23 but is certified to carry up to 28 people.

The aircraft was registered in Indonesia as PK-PAM with Pelita Air Service, flying on behalf of the Conoco oil company. It was based in Singapore, and used in support of offshore drilling in a 28-seat configuration.

On 6 March 1992, the aircraft was registered N26PR to Paragon Ranch, Broomfield, Colorado. By 1996, N26PR was owned by Mirabella Yachts Inc, Palm Beach, Florida – Sep 1996 photo: http://www.abpic.co.uk/photo/1064553/

On 8 December 1997, Mirabella Yachts reregistered the aircraft as N42MY. It was based at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Florida and at Fort Pierce Airport, Florida. Here is a 2003 photo: http://www.airliners.net/photo/Grumman-G-111-Albatross/0457395/L/&sid=aac86aa3f09e8f84dbe6e378e17e8e90
On 21 January 2009, N42MY was registered to Sherman Aircraft Sales and advertised for sale – initially at $995,000, and later at US$795,000, based at West Palm Beach Airport, Florida, with a total of 4,433 flying hours.

In March 2012, N42MY was acquired by Australian businessman Mack McCormack, but registered to the Bank of Utah as trustee.

It was flown to Salt Lake City, Utah, for inspections and repainting. It then flew to North County Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida and on 25 March 2012, it flew to the Port of Palm Beach at Lake Worth Inlet to be loaded onto the ship MV Suomigracht for transport to Australia. Photos of N42MY being loaded aboard: http://www.superyacht-australia.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Sevenstar.png ).

It was shipped to Newcastle, NSW, arriving on 20 April 2012, and was flown to Newcastle Airport.

On 23 April 2012, the aircraft flew from Bankstown to Sydney Harbour, where it landed and water-taxied past the Opera House to the former flying boat base at Rose Bay, before taking off again and returning to Bankstown.

On 25-26 April 2012, it flew across to Perth Airport. On 27 April 2012, N42MY took off from Perth Airport, flew along the Swan River, and ten minutes later landed and took off in Matilda Bay. Matilda Bay was once the base for US Navy and RAAF Catalina flying boats during World War Two. N42MY then flew to Rottnest Island and landed in Thompson Bay, then took off and flew to RAAF Base Pearce.

Mr McCormack plans to base the Albatross in Broome and use the aircraft to fly tourist and charter flights in and around the Kimberley region of Western Australia, including the Horizontal Waterfalls, Montgomery Reef, Prince Region and off the coast at Rowley Shoals.

Photos and history © David Eyre

19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-BQO Christen Eagle II (cn V81) owned by Eagle Magic Pty Ltd VH-MRI Victa Airtourer 115 (cn 158) owned by Susan ClarkeThese aircraft performed an aerobatic and formation flying display, including this opposition pass.Photo © Michael Foss
19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-CTP Flight Design CTLS (cn F-08-05-16) owned by Basilio Lenzo These aircraft are designed and built in Germany. CTLS stands for Composite Technology Light Sport.Photo © David Eyre
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-DGZ Glaser-Dirks DG-1000S glider (cn 10-92S65) owned by Beverley Soaring Society Inc, Beverley, WAThis was brought in by road for static display.The DG-1000S is a German two-seat glider with 20-metre wing span, certified for limited aerobatics (+5 to -2.65 Gs).Photo © David Eyre
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-DPV / 038 NZAI CT/4A Airtrainer (cn 038) owned by Brian Collingridge This aircraft was delivered to the RAAF on 4 June 1975, using ferry registration ZK-EAA. It was allocated RAAF serial A19-038. It was sold on 21 June 1993 and registered VH-DPV, but has retained its RAAF “Fanta can” paint scheme, which also led to the type being nicknamed the “Plastic Parrot”.The CT/4 was developed in 1972 by New Zealand Aerospace Industries from the Australian-designed and built Victa Aircruiser, which was based on the 1960s Victa Airtourer. Ironically, in 1967 Victa had to sell the manufacturing rights to AESL (later NZAI) in New Zealand due to lack of Australian Government support. Then in 1975, the RAAF ordered 51 CT/4A aircraft as a primary trainer.Photo © David Eyre
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-FID Beech D18S (cn A-458) owned by Adamson Holdings Pty Ltd, Geraldton, WA., named “Dinky Di”.Although it wears RAAF blue/white WW2 style-roundels, it never served with the military.Built in 1948, ex N628B. This aircraft was imported into Australia in 1961 by Flinders Island Airlines (hence the ‘FI’ in the registration), to replace their aging Avro Ansons.Photo © David Eyre
19 & 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-FJP Embraer 500 Phenom 100 (cn 50000237,
ex PT-TDL) of China Southern West Australian Flying College Pty Ltd, based at Jandakot.
Landing at 9.06am – it was on static display both Saturday and Sunday.This Brazilian designed and built jet is used to train airline pilots for China Southern Airlines, and was delivered on 18 January 2012.Photo 1 © Matt HayesPhotos 2 – 4 © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-INT Cessna 550 Citation II (cn 550-0102) of Revesco Aviation, based at Perth AirportLanding at 09:55.Ex N2664Y, VH-WNP, VH-JCG, VH-JPG, VH-OYCPhoto © Matt Hayes
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-KEB Eurocopter AS350B2 Squirrel (cn 4805) of Heliwest (Power Capital Holdings Pty Ltd)This conducted joyflights.Photo © Matt Hayes
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-LHP Bell 206L-3 LongRanger III (cn 51002) owned by Heliwest (Helibits Pty Ltd). It carries “Rescue” titles as it was the backup helicopter for Surf Life Saving WA, used on beach patrols.This helicopter conducted joyflights.Ex N1084D, G-LIII, G-CJCB.Photo © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-LHY Sikorsky S-76A+ (cn 760105) of CHC Helicopters / operated for the RAAF as a rescue helicopter, based at Pearce.Ex 729 (Royal Jordanian Air Force), ABLE-9.Photo 1 © Matt HayesPhoto 2 © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-LQD Bombardier DHC-8-402 Dash 8Q-400 (cn 4371) of QantaslinkLanding on runway 36R after a short hop from Perth Airport – a flight chartered by aircraft enthusiasts.Photo © Matt Hayes
20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-LVD Kavanagh B-105 (hot air balloon) (cn B105-430), owned by the RAAF, based in Canberra, ACT.This hot air balloon was brought over to WA to help promote the air show, and flew over the city of Perth on Thursday morning. It then made the news on Thursday evening when it landed in suburban street in the northern Perth suburb of Carine on Thursday evening.It performed a tethered flight on the Sunday of the air show.Kavanagh Balloons has been Australia’s only manufacturer of hot air balloons, since 1979.The Kavanagh B-105 has an envelope capacity of 105,000 cubic feet (2,970m³), and can carry up to six people in the basket, including the pilot.Photos © David Eyre
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-MAN / 232003 / 85 Nanchang CJ-6A (cn 232003), owned by S & K Investments Pty Ltd This was on static display on the Sunday.It wears Chinese Air Force (PLAAF) markings, having been formerly owned by them, and was built in 1962.The CJ-6 is a Chinese version of the Russian-designed Yakovlev Yak-18A.Photo © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-NNV Nanchang CJ-6A (cn 5432024) of Fighter Combat InternationalLanding after performing a formation aerobatic display.Built in 1992, ex 5432024 PLAAF.Photo © Matt Hayes
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012Nanchang CJ-6A aircraft of Fighter Combat International, performing a formation aerobatic display (left to right):VH-AYU / 4532020 (cn 4532020, ex 4532020 PLAAF)VH-FCE (cn 3932014, ex 3932014 PLAAF, VH-NNO).VH-NNV (cn 5432024, ex 5432024 PLAAF)Photo © Matt Hayes
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012Nanchang CJ-6A aircraft of Fighter Combat International, taking off for their formation aerobatic display:VH-NNV (cn 5432024, ex 5432024 PLAAF)VH-FCE (cn 3932014, ex 3932014 PLAAF, VH-NNO).Photo © Keith Anderson
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-VOA Beech 1900C (cn UB-62) of Ad Astral AviationLanding on runway 36R – it was parked in the static park for Saturday only.Ex N29995, N819BE, VH-IYP, ZS-NAVPhoto © Matt Hayes
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-NOA Beech 1900D (cn UE-94) of Ad Astral AviationLanding on runway 36R – it was parked in the static park for Saturday only.Ex N94UX, N94GL, ZS-PPX, PK-OCWPhoto © Matt Hayes
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-NTJ / “A85-443” CAC CA-25 Winjeel (cn 25-7) of Tang Holdings Pty LtdThis aircraft was in the air display and static display both air show days.Built in 1955. Although painted as “A85-443”, its real RAAF serial was A85-407.Photo © Matt Hayes
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-PVA Vans RV-7A (cn 71019) owned by Peter Poland, named “Carmella”.Ex N593B.Photo © David Eyre
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-SBO Seabird Seeker ER SB7L-360A (cn 070011) of Dunkel Aviation Pty Ltd Static display – Sunday only.The Seabird Seeker is an Australian-designed observation aircraft built by Seabird Aviation Australia Pty Ltd of Australia and Seabird Aviation Jordan.Appearing like a helicopter cockpit grafted onto the front of an aeroplane, the Seeker is designed as a low-cost alternative to helicopters.Photos © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-TBN Rebel 300 (cn S8-88-008) of Tony Blair, Tamworth, NSWThis aircraft put on a fantastic aerobatic display.Built in 1998. Ex N540UPhoto © Matt Hayes
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-URC Boeing A75N1 Stearman (PT-17 Kaydet) (cn 75-1834) of Heckenbury Pty LtdStatic display – Sunday only. Wears a WW2-style US Army Air Corps blue/yellow colour scheme.Built in 1941. Ex 41-8275, N58403.Photos © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-WPF Gippsland Aeronautics GA-8 Airvan (cn GA8-12-176) of the WA Police Air Wing This aircraft had only just joined the WA Police, and is new – it was registered on 4 May 2012, just two weeks prior to this photo.Photo © David Eyre
Sat 19 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-WWA / A – 106 North American AT-6D Texan (cn 78-7094) of Adrian ThomasPerformed in the air display both days.Built in 1942. Ex 41-16716, 0106 (Paraguayan Air Force), N6069H.Photo © Matt Hayes
19 & 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air Show 2012VH-XKI De Havilland Canada DHC-8-315Q Dash 8Q-300 (cn 587) of Skippers AviationThis aircraft flew in on Saturday and Sunday from its base at Perth Airport, and was part of the static display.Ex C-GDIU, EC-IIA, C-GKUXPhoto 1 © Matt HayesPhotos 2 & 3 © David Eyre
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air ShowTime to go home….A sunset view from the southern car park, where many spectators were stuck trying to get off the RAAF Base.Photo © Keith Anderson
Sun 20 May 2012: RAAF Pearce Air ShowPoor traffic management in the car parks on the base was a major let down for many air show attendees.Despite trying to leave early (40 minutes before the end of the flying display) we were directed away from the exit, but others who left much later were allowed to head straight for the exit and jump the queue. Adding to this, aircraft were moved along the taxiway between the car park and the exit, frequently stopping the car traffic flow (as seen here at 5:40pm).It took us nearly 4 hours to get out of the air base.Photo © David Eyre

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *