CANCELLED: Langley Park Fly-in: 15 October 2016

VH-NHD/B1727/2 Sopwith Pup, owned by Bert Filippi, at Langley Park - 15 October 2011. Photo © David Eyre
VH-NHD/B1727/2 Sopwith Pup, owned by Bert Filippi, at Langley Park – 15 October 2011.
Photo © David Eyre

8 October 2016 © David Eyre (UPDATED 13 October 2016)

UPDATE: Heritage Perth has advised that the event is CANCELLED:

“A site inspection at Langley Park has revealed recent and unseasonal heavy rains have rendered the ground unsafe to use as a landing strip.

Heritage Perth therefore regretfully had no alternative but to cancel the Fly In and other ‘Working Langley Park’ events on Saturday 15 October.”

 

Up to nineteen vintage aircraft will fly in to Langley Park, in the city of Perth, on Saturday 15 October 2016, from 1pm.

The aircraft will land at Langley from 1pm (subject to weather and air traffic) and will be on static display from 1.30pm-2.30pm. The pilots will be there to answer questions.
The aircraft will then take off and depart to Jandakot Airport and Serpentine Airfield.

The event is being held as part of Perth Heritage Days, organised by Heritage Perth and the theme this year is ‘Perth – The Way We Worked’.

Australian Flying Corps commemorated

The fly-in at Langley Park will honour the men who served in the Australian Flying Corps (AFC). The AFC was established in 1912 as the branch of the Australian Army responsible for operating aircraft, though it was not until 1914 that it began flight training.

One hundred years ago in 1916, the AFC was declared operational and fought in Europe during World War One. The four operational squadrons of the AFC were (listed with AFC designation and British Royal Flying Corps designation):

  • No.1 Squadron AFC / No. 67 (Australian) Squadron RFC: Established 1 January 1916 (Palestine)
  • No.2 Squadron AFC / No. 68 (Australian) Squadron RFC: Established 20 September 1916(Western Front)
  • No.3 Squadron AFC / No. 69 (Australian) Squadron RFC: Established 19 September 1916(Western Front)
  • No.4 Squadron AFC / No. 71 (Australian) Squadron RFC: Established 16 October 1916(Western Front)

In 1921, the AFC became the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF).

There will also be a talk by aviation and military historian Glen Darlington, titled ‘Rags Sticks and Wire in War’, a tribute to the Western Australian men and machines of the Australian Flying Corp 1916–2016.
Many of the men in the AFC came from Perth, or from rural towns and farms throughout WA. Some pilots were also from Western Australia’s10th Light Horse Regiment, which is still active today. A re-enactment Troop from this regiment will present a display in authentic uniforms and saddlery from the period. There will also be a display of veteran and vintage cars and motorcycles, including a restored World War I Ford Model A, dressed as a vehicle of the Australian Flying Corps.
A similar event was held last year, with thirteen aircraft flying in. SEE OUR PHOTOS FROM THE 2015 LANGLEY PARK FLY-IN

Norman Brearley’s airline, Western Australian Airways (WAA), began the first airline  operations in Australia in 1921 (a year before Qantas), initially based at Langley Park.

With the construction of Elizabeth Quay and its proposed high-rise buildings to be built in the flight path, the days of Langley Park being used as an airstrip are numbered.

Aircraft

Details and photos of all participating aircraft are below.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: All photographs and videos displayed on this website are copyright protected and may not be used, sold, copied or reproduced by anyone, including the media, without express written permission of the individual photographers. If you wish to obtain or use a photo, please email AviationWA@gmail.com.

The Boeing Stearman was used as a military trainer aircraft during the 1930s and 1940s – at least 10,626 were built in the USA.

VH-URC Boeing A75N1 Stearman (PT-17 Kaydet) (MSN 75-1834) owned by Heckenbury Pty Ltd, at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-URC Boeing A75N1 Stearman (PT-17 Kaydet) (MSN 75-1834) owned by Heckenbury Pty Ltd, at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Built in 1941 as a PT-17 Kaydet. Ex 41-8275, N58403. Wears a WW2-style US Army Air Corps blue/yellow colour scheme. Photo © Keith Anderson.
VH-YDF / 4269 / 591 Boeing B75N1 (N2S-3) Stearman (MSN 75-2599B) owned by Julian Walter at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-YDF / 4269 / 591 Boeing B75N1 (N2S-3) Stearman (MSN 75-2599B) owned by Julian Walter at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Built in 1941, ex BuNo.4269, N3188, N59127, (VH-JDF not taken up). Photo © Keith Anderson.
VH-YND / "42-755362 / 362" Boeing E75 (N2S-5) Stearman (MSN 75-5362) owned by Carl Ende, at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-YND / “42-755362 / 362” Boeing E75 (N2S-5) Stearman (MSN 75-5362) owned by Carl Ende, at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Wears US Navy markings. Built in 1942 as a PT-13D with US Army Air Force serial 42-17199, but was transferred to the US Navy as an N2S-5, with serial number 61240. It is believed to have then gone to owner in Nicaragua before arriving in Australia. Photo © Keith Anderson.

The Culp Special is a two-seat American aerobatic aircraft, intended to resemble aircraft of the 1930s. It can be supplied as a kit or scratch-built using plans for amateur construction. The one on display was scratch-built and first flew in 2007.

VH-ZUZ Culp Special (MSN CS-1947) owned by Peter Cashman at Serpentine Airfield – Sat 21 March 2015. Landing on the grass runway 27. Built in 2003. Peter built it from plans - some bits he had to guess. Sourced all parts himself. Took 6000hrs over 3 years (or 40 hrs/wk, 52 weeks/yr). Hardest was hand-making the cowlings by "tin bashing". Photo © David Eyre
VH-ZUZ Culp Special (MSN CS-1947) owned by Peter Cash at Serpentine Airfield – Sat 21 March 2015.
Built by Peter Cash from scratch, using plans from the designers. Took 6,000hrs over 3 years (or 40 hrs/wk, 52 weeks/yr). First flown January 2007. Photo © David Eyre

The British De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth was first flown in 1931 and over 8,800 were built, until production ended in 1944. Many were used as training aircraft during and after World War Two.

VH-AMW De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN A17-208) owned by Shine Air Pty Ltd and piloted by Chris Shine.
VH-AMW De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN A17-208) owned by Shine Air Pty Ltd and piloted by Chris Shine, at Jandakot Airport – 26 January 2016.
Built in 1940 by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW. Served with the RAAF. Photo © Allan Tilley.
VH-AUS / A17-743 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1074) owned by Gregory Shaw of Esperance, WA, at a private airstrip in Mundijong, WA - Sat 3 November 2012. Built in 1944 by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW. To RAAF as A17-743 on 22 Nov 1944. Sold and registered VH-AUS on 24 Sep 1946. Photo © David Eyre
VH-AUS / A17-743 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1074) owned by Gregory Shaw of Esperance, WA, at a private airstrip in Mundijong, WA – Sat 3 November 2012.
Built in 1944 by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW. To RAAF as A17-743 on 22 Nov 1944. Sold and registered VH-AUS on 24 Sep 1946.
Photo © David Eyre
VH-BAR/A17-666 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA816/T342) flown by Kevin Bailey, over the Swan River near South Perth - Tue 26 January 2016 - Australia Day Air Show. Flying towards the Narrows Bridge. Photo taken from VH-BTP / A17-744 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1075/T315) owned by Clark Rees. Photo © David Eyre
VH-BAR/A17-666 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA816/T342) flown by Kevin Bailey, over the Swan River near South Perth – Tue 26 January 2016 – Australia Day Air Show.
Built by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW in August 1943. Was built for South African Air Force as DX759 but delivered to RAAF as A17-666. One of the last RAAF Tiger Moths to be sold – it was registered VH-BAR in July 1958. Photo © David Eyre
VH-BTP / A17-744 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1075/T315) flown by Clark Rees, with David Eyre of AAWA in the front cockpit, at Jandakot Airport - Tue 26 January 2016 - Australia Day Air Show. Climbing after take-off from runway 24 Right at 3:40pm, as part of the 'Beautiful Biplanes' formation. Photo © Allan Tilley
VH-BTP / A17-744 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1075/T315) flown by Clark Rees, at Jandakot Airport – Tue 26 January 2016 – Australia Day Air Show.
Built in 1944 for the RAAF as A17-744. Sold in 1955 and registered VH-BTP. Was based in WA and operated from Maylands and now Jandakot. Photo © Allan Tilley
VH-CKF/A17-421 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA596/T200), flown by Trevor Jones, over Hamilton Hill, Tue 26 January 2016 - Australia Day Air Show. Heading back to Jandakot. Photo taken from VH-BTP / A17-744 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1075/T315) flown by Clark Rees. Photo © David Eyre
VH-CKF/A17-421 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA596/T200), flown by Trevor Jones, over Hamilton Hill, Tue 26 January 2016 – Australia Day Air Show.
Built in 1941 by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW. Ordered for Rhodesia as DX535 but allocated to the RAAF as A17-421. Following RAAF service, it was acquired by the Department of Civil Aviation in 1947 as VH-AZL, later re-registered VH-CAG. It was later used as a glider towing aircraft as VH-TUG before being reregistered VH-CKF. Photo © David Eyre
VH-CXL De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN LES8) owned by Lydia Mitton, at SABC Annual Fly In, Serpentine Airfield – Sun 27 September 2015. Built in 1961, as one of 11 Tiger Moths assembled by Lawrence Engineering and Sales Pty Ltd at Camden, NSW, in 1959-61 using a collection of British-built RAF Tiger Moth parts acquired from disposals sales. VH-CXL was registered on 8 March 1961, and was acquired by its current owner in 2000. Photo © David Eyre
VH-CXL De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN LES8) owned by Lydia Mitton, at SABC Annual Fly In, Serpentine Airfield – Sun 27 September 2015.
Built in 1961, as one of 11 Tiger Moths assembled by Lawrence Engineering and Sales Pty Ltd at Camden, NSW, in 1959-61 using a collection of British-built RAF Tiger Moth parts acquired from disposals sales. Photo © David Eyre
VH-FAS / A17-37 De Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA34) of Griffin Aviation Pty Ltd (operated by Royal Aero Club of Western Australia Inc) at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-FAS / A17-37 De Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA34) of Griffin Aviation Pty Ltd (operated by Royal Aero Club of Western Australia Inc) at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Built in 1942 for the RAAF as A17-37. It was sold in 1947 as VH-RJA and later became VH-FAS. It ditched in the Swan River in November 1995 and had to be rebuilt. Photo © Keith Anderson.
VH-NIG/N9129/29 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN 82248) owned by Nigel T Emmans ”, at SABC Annual Fly In, Serpentine Airfield – Sun 25 September 2016. Based at Serpentine. Painted in RAF camouflage.
VH-NIG/N9129/29 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN 82248) owned by Nigel T Emmans ”, at SABC Annual Fly In, Serpentine Airfield – Sun 25 September 2016. Based at Serpentine. Painted in RAF camouflage. Built in 1939. One of 100 Tiger Moths imported to Australia (in addition to production at Bankstown, NSW). Served with RAAF, but retained RAF serial N9129.
Photo © Keith Anderson
VH-NOV De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1088) flown by Barry Markham with Perth city behind, Tue 26 January 2016 - Australia Day Air Show. This aircraft was built by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW in 1945, and was delivered to the RAAF as A17-757. It was sold in 1956 and became VH-RNQ with Royal Newcastle Aero Club, Broadmeadow, NSW, but was damaged in 1959 and sold for spares. Barry Markham restored the aircraft in 1991 as VH-NOV and in 1998, set a number of records when he flew it from Perth to London, to raise funds for the RFDS. Photo taken from VH-BTP / A17-744 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1075/T315) flown by Clark Rees, whilst we flew over North Coogee, near Fremantle. Photo © David Eyre
VH-NOV De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA1088) flown by Barry Markham with Perth city behind, Tue 26 January 2016 – Australia Day Air Show.
This aircraft was built by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW in 1945, and was delivered to the RAAF as A17-757. It was sold in 1956 and became VH-RNQ with Royal Newcastle Aero Club, Broadmeadow, NSW, but was damaged in 1959 and sold for spares. Barry Markham restored the aircraft in 1991 as VH-NOV and in 1998, set a number of records when he flew it from Perth to London, to raise funds for the RFDS. Photo © David Eyre
VH-WFN / A17-649 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA799) owned by William Dearle, at SABC Annual Fly In, Serpentine Airfield – Sun 25 September 2016. Built in 1942 by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW. Originally built for South Africa as DX742, but delivered to the RAAF as A17-649. Sold by RAAF and became VH-RNO on 10 June 1955 with Royal Newcastle Aero Club. Re-registered VH-WFN on 15 Aug 1959 to Aero Service Pty Ltd, it was based at the former Maylands Aerodrome in Perth. It has had a number of owners, accidents and rebuilds in subsequent years. Photo © David Eyre
VH-WFN / A17-649 De Havilland DH-82A Tiger Moth (MSN DHA799) owned by William Dearle, at SABC Annual Fly In, Serpentine Airfield – Sun 25 September 2016.
Built in 1942 by De Havilland Aircraft at Bankstown, NSW. Originally built for South Africa as DX742, but delivered to the RAAF as A17-649. Sold by RAAF and became VH-RNO on 10 June 1955 with Royal Newcastle Aero Club. Re-registered VH-WFN on 15 Aug 1959 to Aero Service Pty Ltd, it was based at the former Maylands Aerodrome in Perth. Photo © David Eyre

The De Havilland DH-83 Fox Moth was used as a small passenger aircraft from the 1930s. 154 were built from 1931 to just after World War Two. It uses the same engine, tailplane, fin, rudder and wings as the De Havilland DH-82 Tiger Moth. The pilot sits in a raised cockpit behind the small enclosed passenger cabin, which has three seats and windows. The Fox Moth on display was used by the Flying Doctor Service.

VH-USJ De Havilland DH-83 Fox Moth (MSN 4058) at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-USJ De Havilland DH-83 Fox Moth (MSN 4058) at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Built in 1933 in the UK as G-AECB and exported to Australia in 1935 where it was operated by MacRobertson Miller Aviation as part of the Flying Doctor Service Photo © Keith Anderson.

The De Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk is a two-seat training aircraft, designed to replace the de Havilland Tiger Moth biplane trainer. It was designed by a Polish designer for the Canadian arm of the British De Havilland company and first flew at Toronto, Canada in 1946. The aircraft is all-metal, apart from the fabric-covered control surfaces. 1,283 were built in Canada, the UK and Portugal between 1947 and 1956, with over 500 still flying. The one on display today was built in the UK and operated by the Royal Air Force.

VH-RHW / WB677 De Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk T.10 (MSN C1/0125) owned by Glen Caple at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-RHW / WB677 De Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk T.10 (MSN C1/0125) owned by Glen Caple at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Built in the UK in 1950 and delivered to the RAF in August 1950 as WB677. Registered in Australia in 1957 as VH-RHW by the Royal Aero Club of Western Australia, initially based at Maylands Aerodrome and then Perth Airport before being sold. Photo © Nick Stubbs-Ross.

The Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer was originally designed by Great Lakes Aircraft Corporation of Cleveland, Ohio in 1929 and was very popular as a two-seat biplane aerobatic aircraft. Since the 1960s to today, various companies have either produced the aircraft or sold plans. The one on display was built in 2001.

VH-WQW Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer (MSN 003) owned by Franciscus Smit, at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-WQW Great Lakes 2T-1A-2 Sport Trainer (MSN 003) owned by Franciscus Smit, at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Built in 2001, ex N264SA. This biplane was originally designed by Great Lakes Aircraft Corporation of Cleveland, Ohio in 1929. The aircraft were very popular as an aerobatic aircraft and from the 1960s to today, a number of individuals or companies have either produced or sold plans for the aircraft. Photo © Keith Anderson.

The Sopwith Pup was a British single-seat fighter built from 1916 to 1918, and a total of 1,770 were produced. It entered service in late 1916. When it was later outclassed by newer fighters, the Pup was used for training. Almost all of the parts in VH-NHD are original, but only the windshield and joystick are actually from B-1727 and for that reason it had to be registered as a ‘replica’.
** If the wind is too strong, then the Sopwith Pup will not fly and will be replaced with another of Bert Filippi’s vintage aircraft.

VH-NHD/B1727/2 Sopwith Pup, owned by Bert Filippi, at Langley Park - 15 October 2011. Photo © David Eyre
VH-NHD/B1727/2 Sopwith Pup, owned by Bert Filippi, at Langley Park – 15 October 2011.
Almost 90% of the parts on this aircraft are original, but only the windshield and joystick are from B-1727, so it had to be registered as a replica. Photo © David Eyre

The WACO Classic Aircraft YMF-5C is a modified version of the 1930s WACO YMF three-seat  aerobatic biplane, built to meet current safety standards. This aircraft seats two passengers side-by-side in front, with the pilot behind.

VH-YRB WACO Aircraft YMF-F5C (MSN F5C105) owned by Archibald Dudgeon at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
VH-YRB WACO Aircraft YMF-F5C (MSN F5C105) owned by Archibald Dudgeon at Langley Park – 17 October 2015.
Built in 2005, ex N105KS.  Photo © Clyde Lannan.

David Eyre

President, Aviation Association of WA Inc

10 thoughts on “CANCELLED: Langley Park Fly-in: 15 October 2016

  • October 9, 2016 at 3:57 pm
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    Shared on the The Perth Helicopter Facebook page, this will be a great event all round!

    Reply
  • October 10, 2016 at 7:55 pm
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    Can you please tell me what time the planes will start landing in Saturday ??

    Reply
    • October 11, 2016 at 5:47 pm
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      Aircraft will land from 1pm to 1:30pm, will be on the ground from 1:30pm-2:30pm with pilots answering questions, and will take-off shortly after.

      Reply
  • October 13, 2016 at 12:10 am
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    Pretty sure it was cancelled today due to the condition of Langley Parks surface

    Reply
    • October 14, 2016 at 5:40 pm
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      Pity.
      I was looking forward to seeing a
      Sopwith Pup as well as the other early fighter aircraft.
      My father flew a Sopwith Camel in WW1 and survived 6 weeks with a crash or two before returning to England to train other pilots.
      I have some great pictures of other combat aircraft of that time. Originals taken by him I presume.

      Reply
      • October 14, 2016 at 5:54 pm
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        I would be interested to see any originals or replicas of aircraft of WW1 vintage – or to hear from anybody who has anything related to the above or who would be interested in the ancient photos
        Eric Lawson

        Reply
  • October 14, 2016 at 9:55 am
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    Is there an Update, please?

    Reply
    • October 14, 2016 at 6:44 pm
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      The fly-in is definitely cancelled. The ground is waterlogged and the surface was damaged by heavy vehicles clearing up after Octoberfest.

      Reply
  • October 14, 2016 at 6:40 pm
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    Pity it was cancelled. I was looking forward to seeing the old aircraft, especially the Sopwith Pup. My father flew a Sopwith Camel in France for about six weeks before his final crash.

    Reply

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