Antonov An-225 Mriya – World’s largest aircraft, to visit Perth (UPDATED WITH LATEST INFO)

*** 1st Visit and type to Perth and 1st Visit and type to Australia***
*** 1st Visit and type to Perth and 1st Visit and type to Australia***
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Perth Airport – 15 May 2016.
On finals for runway 21 at 11:48 am.
Photo © Keith Anderson (Photographed using Canon cameras and lenses)

20 February 2016 © David Eyre (UPDATED 23 March 2016, 8 April 2016, 23 April 2016, 7 May 2016, 10 May 2016, 12 May 2016, 13 May 2016, 14 May 2016, 15 May 2016, 16 May 2016, 17 May 2016)

The mighty six-engined Antonov An-225 Mriya (‘Dream’), arrived in Perth on 15 May 2016, arriving staying for two days – dates and times (SUBJECT TO CHANGE):

  • Sun 15 May 2016: Arrived 11.52AM

  • Tue 17 May 2016: Departing 5:30AM, taking off at 5:40AM (UPDATED 17 May 2016: see comments below)

UPDATE Tuesday 17 May 2016: The An-225 is scheduled to depart on Tuesday 17 May 2016 at 5:30am and take off at 5:40am, as flight number ADB3655. It will be flying direct to Dubai World Centre Airport (Al Maktoum) in the United Arab Emirates, then Milan (Italy), and later to Leipzig (Germany), Cairo (Egypt), then Abu Dhabi (UAE).

At the time of writing (4am Tuesday) Runway 03 is in use, so the An-225 will start the take-off run at southern end, and be airborne by north end. The Public Viewing Area on Dunreath Drive and Terminal 1 (International) Observation Deck on Level 3 are already open.

Forecast winds for the departure time are light (NNW at 5 knots).

NOTE: Take-off direction is subject to change, dependent on winds at the time of departure. AviationWA recommends checking FlightRadar24.com or Planefinder.com (or their phone apps) to see which runway the aircraft are using.

  • Sunday 15 May 2016: Kuala Lumpur air traffic delays caused the An-225 to depart late, at 6:11AM Malaysian time. It arrived in Perth at 11:52am on runway 21 (north end), as we predicted.  The aircraft then continued along the full length of the runway to slowly taxy past the Antonov Special Zone, on the southeast side of the runway. Spectators at the Dunreath Drive Public Viewing Area also had a good view.
  • Saturday 14 May 2016: The An-225 departed Hyderabad, India and arrived at Kuala Lumpur.
  • Friday 13 May 2016: The An-225 departed Turkmenbashi, Turkmenistan and arrived at Hyderabad, India. On Saturday, it departs for Kuala Lumpur.
  • Thursday 12 May 2016: The An-225 departed Prague with the power generator aboard. Whilst en-route there appears to have been was a technical issue, as two sets of main wheels were not retracted. The aircraft reached its planned destination of Turkmenbashi, Turkmenistan, where the undercarriage problem was fixed and the aircraft refuelled whilst the crew rested.
  • Wednesday 11 May 2016: The Brush power generator was loaded aboard the aircraft by international logistics company DB Schenker.
  • Tuesday 10 May 2016: The An-225 departed its home base at Gostomel (near Kiev), Ukraine and has arrived at Prague, Czech Republic, where it will be loaded with the massive 117-tonne generator.

The An-225 is the longest and heaviest aircraft ever built, with a maximum takeoff weight of 640 tonnes, and has the largest wingspan of any aircraft in operational service. It was designed and developed in the 1980s as a derivative of the An-124, to carry the Russian ‘Buran’ space shuttle above the fuselage.

Deutsche Welle TV, a German television broadcaster, is creating a documentary depicting the journey of the generator and will travel on board the plane all the way from Prague to Perth.

Flight updates

Spectator arrangements (for 15 May)

Spectators are visiting from various parts of Australia, specifically to see this aircraft.

The aircraft will land against the wind.

The spectator arrangements have been made on the assumption that on 15 May, it will land on the main runway (Runway 21), approaching from the north. However, if the winds are from the north or east, it will approach from the south.

If it lands on the north end of the main runway, it will continue rolling to the southern end before turning off the runway and onto taxiway C11, and will slowly taxy north, past the special ‘Antonov Event Zone’ – some vacant land between the taxiway and Airport Drive.

The Antonov Event Zone opens at 7:00AM. It is sandy/muddy and not paved, so please dress appropriately (closed in shoes) for the conditions. Amenities such as toilets and food vans will be on site. This is a no smoking event and no pets are allowed on site. Parking is free of charge in Long Term Car Parks G and K (see map below). Standard parking fees will apply in all other car parks.

The aircraft will park opposite the International Terminal on a remote parking bay.

The Observation Deck in Terminal 1 International has limited capacity and is expected to be full early, with long queues of spectators and long wait times. Perth Airport will therefore impose time restrictions and clear all visitors every 30 minutes.

There is restricted viewing in the other terminals (T1 Domestic, T3 and T4), and they are not recommended vantage points.

The Public Viewing Area on Dunreath Drive will be open from 7:30AM, but only has capacity for 400 people and is also expected to fill up very quickly. The gates will be closed when the car park is full.

Perth Airport will provide updates via twitter @perthairport

 

Airport-Drive-Map

The cargo

UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic - Wed 11 May 2016. Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft. Photo courtesy DB Schenker
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic – Wed 11 May 2016.
Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft.
Photo courtesy DB Schenker
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic - Wed 11 May 2016. Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft. Photo courtesy DB Schenker
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic – Wed 11 May 2016.
Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft.
Photo courtesy DB Schenker
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic - Wed 11 May 2016. Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft. Photo courtesy Antonov Company
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic – Wed 11 May 2016.
Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft.
Photo courtesy Antonov Company
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic - Wed 11 May 2016. Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft. Photo courtesy Antonov Company
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic – Wed 11 May 2016.
Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft.
Photo courtesy Antonov Company
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic - Wed 11 May 2016. Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft. Photo courtesy Antonov Company
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic – Wed 11 May 2016.
Logistics company DB Schenker loading the 117-tonne Brush power generator onto the aircraft.
Photo courtesy Antonov Company
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic - Wed 11 May 2016. Antonov crew standing in front of the aircraft. Photo courtesy Antonov Company
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763/01-01) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Prague Airport, Czech Republic – Wed 11 May 2016.
Antonov crew standing in front of the aircraft.
Photo courtesy Antonov Company

The flight was arranged by the Australian arm of the international transport and logistics company DB Schenker, which has a extensive experience in handling challenging and difficult shipments for some of the world’s largest resources projects.The company employs 990 people in Australia and 65,000 employees in 130 countries around the world.

“Organising airfreight via an Antonov 225 is a particular highlight because it’s a unique challenge with a very special aircraft”, says Frank Vogel, Director – Projects / Oil and Gas, AU / NZ, DB Schenker.

The aircraft will be delivering an ultra-heavy 117-Tonne power generator for a mining company, flying from Prague in the Czech Republic, with several refuelling stops en-route across Eurasia and South East Asia before it finally reaches Perth.

The Project Management and execution of this challenging shipment will be handled by DB Schenker’s Adelaide and Perth Offices, working in conjunction with the supplier in Europe and the Western Australian site to ensure a safe and smooth delivery of the equipment.

Antonov An-225: Interesting Facts and Specifications

  • The An-225 is the world’s largest operational heavier-than-air aircraft in terms of length and wingspan (see diagram below).
  • It has set 240 world records, including heaviest cargo load (253.8 tons) and longest cargo (two 42.1-metre wind turbine blades).
  • The aircraft has six engines, which generate 140 tons of thrust at take-off. The aircraft burns 24 tonnes of fuel per hour and cruises at 800 km/hour.
  • An-225 was built to carry outsized cargo inside the fuselage (up to 250 tonnes – equivalent to 50 cars) or externally on top of the fuselage (up to 200 tonnes), such as the Buran space shuttle.
  • The twin tails were to allow it to carry external cargo loads on its back.
  • The nose cone hinges upwards to allow cargo to be loaded.
  • The cargo hold is 43 metres long, 6.4 metres wide and 4.4 metres tall.
  • The cargo hold has a four-point lifting crane which can carry up to 30 tonnes. The crane can move along rails on the roof to ease loading and unloading.
  • Fully loaded, the aircraft weighs 640 tonnes and would require 3.2 kilometres of runway to take off.
  • 32 wheels spread the weight of the aircraft when it is on the ground. The An-225 has nosegear designed to kneel down, so cargo can be more easily loaded and unloaded. There are 20 steerable wheels: four in the nose gear and 16 at the rear of the 28-wheel main gear, to help maneuver on the ground.
  • Only one An-225 was completed; a second An-225 was partly built, but stored – it would cost over $300 million to complete it.
  • An even bigger aircraft was planned, the 8-engined An-325, but this never got off the drawing board.
  • An-225 was designed and built in the Ukraine, and is based at Gostomel Airport, Ukraine.
  • An-225 is based on the smaller An-124 (also a large aircraft), with 90% parts commonality, but the An-225 has a different tail and no rear loading ramp. 55 An-124s were built and these have visit Western Australia occasionally.
  • First flew in 1988. Was stored for 7 years (1994 – 2001) and stripped of spare parts, following the end of the Buran space shuttle program in 1991. Was refurbished during 2000-2001 and re-entered service.
  • With no cargo aboard, it can take 355 tonnes of fuel – enough to stay airborne for 18 hours or 14,000 km.
  • The aircraft has 19 crew members for this flight. There are six seats in the cockpit; two pilots, two flight engineers, a navigator and a radio operator. A relief navigator and relief radio operator sit in the front crew compartment. In addition, there are 11 technicians in the crew; a Load master/Senior engineer, two engineers, fuel and fire fighting technicians, two hydraulics and landing gear technicians, an airframe and controls technician, a pneumatics and air con technician, an electrician, an instrument technician, a radio technician, a test systems technician and a flight manager.
  • Half of the crew and the passengers (including a German TV documentary crew for this flight) stay in the rear crew compartment, in the upper rear fuselage. There is no access between the front and rear compartments during flight, as the cargo hold is not pressurised.
  • The An-225 is expensive to operate – it is reportedly cheaper to use two An-124s.
  • The An-225 has performed humanitarian flights, delivering supplies and equipment to disaster zones. 
  • The aircraft has two auxillary power units (APUs) – miniature gas turbine engines – to generate its own electrical power when on the ground.
Size comparison of the world's largest aircraft. Drawing by Clem Tillier (clem AT tillier.net) - Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1098131
Size comparison of the world’s largest aircraft.
Drawing by Clem Tillier (clem AT tillier.net) – Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1098131
Crew: 6 Empty weight: (zero-fuel-weight) 175 tonnes
Length: 84 m Max take-off weight: 600 tonnes
Wingspan: 88.4 m Cargo hold – volume 1,225 cbm (L 43.35m, W 6.4m, H 4.4m)
Height: 18.1 m Power plant: 6 × ZMKB Progress D-18 turbofans, 229.5 kNeach
Wing Area: 905 sq m Flight range with 200 tonne payload: 4,000 km

Design and differences to the An-124

Registered UR-82060 and owned by Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau), the An-225 was designed and built by the Antonov Design Bureau in the 1980s in Ukraine when it was part of the Soviet Union. It is the only flying example.

The An-225 is reportedly expensive to operate, so it is only used to transport extremely large and heavy cargo loads that cannot be carried by the An-124.

The An-225 was developed by enlarging the An-124 – fuselage barrel extensions were added in front of and behind the wings, which were also enlarged to increase span. Two more Progress D-18T turbofan engines were added to the larger wing, bringing the total to six. Stronger landing gear with 32 wheels was added, and some of these wheels can be steered to enable the massive aircraft to turn within a 60-metre wide runway. It is not designed for short runway operations.

It also differs to the smaller An-124 by not having a rear cargo door and ramp – these were deleted to reduce weight. The tail was redesigned from a single vertical fin to have twin tails on a widened tailplane – this was necessary to allow the aircraft to carry outsized loads externally, such as the Russian Buran space shuttle.

History of UR-82060

Completed on 21 December 1988 at Gostomel, Ukraine, registered CCCP-480182.

Displayed at the Paris Air Show in June 1989, now registered CCCP-82060, carrying the 60-tonne Buran space shuttle on top.

CCCP-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763) of Antonov Design Bureau with Buran space shuttle atop at Paris Air Show - Paris-Le Bourget - June 1989. Photo via Buran-Energia.com
CCCP-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763) of Antonov Design Bureau with Buran space shuttle atop at Paris Air Show – Paris-Le Bourget – June 1989.
Photo via Buran-Energia.com

It was given the Ukrainian registration UR-82060 in 1993.

After the Buran space shuttle program was cancelled, the An-225 was withdrawn from use at Gostomel, in April 1994, with a total flying time of 671 hours and 339 flights. It was stripped of spare parts for use on Antonov Airlines’ An-124 fleet – the six engines were removed for use on An-124s.

Antonov realised that there was a need for an aircraft capable of carrying larger and heavier loads than the An-124. UR-82060 was refurbished in 2000 at a cost of $20 million, with a new cockpit, avionics and safety systems, new passenger cabin on the upper deck, reinforced fuselage to carry heavier payloads and Stage III hush kits on the engines. It made its first flight on 7 May 2001, after 7 years on the ground.

UR-82060 holds the absolute world records for an airlifted single item payload of 189,980 kilograms (418,834 pounds) and an airlifted total payload of 253,820 kilograms (559,577 pounds). It has also transported a payload of 247,000 kilograms (545,000 pounds) on a commercial flight.

UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Asian Aerospace 1994, Singapore - 23 February 1994. Parked next to a US Air Force Lockheed C-5A Galaxy, which was once the world's largest operational aircraft. Photo © Keith Anderson
UR-82060 Antonov An-225 Mriya (MSN 19530503763) of Antonov Airlines (Antonov Design Bureau) at Asian Aerospace 1994, Singapore – 23 February 1994.
Parked next to a US Air Force Lockheed C-5A Galaxy, which was once the world’s largest operational aircraft.
Photo © Keith Anderson

Second An-225 and the even larger An-325

Construction of a second An-225 was started in the late 1980s, but after the collapse of the Soviet Union and due to lack of funds, construction ceased in 1994 and it was placed in storage at Kiev.

In September 2006, Antonov announced that it would complete the second An-225 by 2008, but this was then delayed.

By August 2009, the aircraft was about 60-70% complete when work was stopped due to lack of funds. Completion requires at least $300 million and three years.

In April 2013, the Russian government announced plans to revive air launched spacecraft, using a modified An-225 as a mid-air launchpad, but the Ukraine/Russia conflict ended these plans.

Antonov had plans to build an even larger An-325 with eight engines, but this did not make it off the drawing board.

David Eyre

President, Aviation Association of WA Inc

61 thoughts on “Antonov An-225 Mriya – World’s largest aircraft, to visit Perth (UPDATED WITH LATEST INFO)

  • February 22, 2016 at 12:51 pm
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    Hopefully the pilot will not attempt to land at JAD.
    Could be entertaining….

    Reply
  • February 22, 2016 at 6:22 pm
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    Hi David

    This is a fantastic post! Very informative and certainly whetting my appetite for a visit in April!

    I hope some possible dates are released soon so we on the Eastern seaboard can start looking for (reasonably) cheap flights!

    Cheers
    Damian
    CQ Plane Spotting Blog

    Reply
  • March 19, 2016 at 7:04 pm
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    Hello, Do you have any definite dates as to when the plane will arrive in Perth?

    Reply
    • March 19, 2016 at 11:35 pm
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      Hi Lesley,
      Specific dates will not be known until the cargo is confirmed as being ready.
      Regards,
      David

      Reply
      • April 19, 2016 at 12:17 pm
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        which will be when please? when will we know the time of landing please?

        Reply
        • April 20, 2016 at 6:05 am
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          Hi Louise,
          We cannot give an exact time yet, as it is all subject to change.
          The arrival is dependent on a number of factors.
          The latest information is that the originally scheduled arrival date of Sunday 15 May may also change. We will provide the information as soon as it is available, but even then it will be subject to change.

          Reply
    • April 21, 2016 at 2:43 pm
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      15th may, the news mentioned said…

      Reply
  • March 25, 2016 at 10:05 pm
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    Looking forward to this one

    Reply
  • April 2, 2016 at 8:47 pm
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    Does anyone know the time it’s arriving?

    Reply
  • April 6, 2016 at 8:21 am
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    Hi every one,its michael frm perth wa can any tell me what time on may 15th the antonov cargo plane arrives @ perth international airport?
    Leslie and david eta arrival date for the antonov is sunday 15th of may 2016.all info on google confirms arrival date .the plane viewing look out platform where plane spotters stand WILL b packed with people.

    Reply
    • April 6, 2016 at 6:36 pm
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      Hi Michael,
      The arrival date of 15 May 2016 is already written in the article. The comment of mine you’re referring to was made before the date was confirmed.
      I agree that the Viewing Area will likely be packed with people – they usually close the car park when it is full and cars are not permitted to park outside the car park, though I am unsure if they will allow it for the An-225 visit.

      Reply
  • April 23, 2016 at 8:04 am
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    Can you tell me what time in Perth it will arrive in Perth on May the 15, and what time it will leave so I can plan ahead. Can’t wait to see it I love huge planes. Thank you.

    Reply
  • April 23, 2016 at 8:19 am
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    Thanks for the quick reply. Fantastic.

    Reply
    • May 11, 2016 at 9:28 am
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      Ooh, it’s getting closer , can’t wait ! Hermanna

      Reply
  • April 25, 2016 at 12:44 am
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    Hi David,

    Thanks so much for the informative post! I’m an oversea student staying in Adelaide and love to fly to Perth to meet it.
    Wish everyone enjoy this amazing lady visit!

    Cheers,
    Lawrence

    Reply
  • April 25, 2016 at 1:14 am
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    Hello David,
    May I ask a question, normally where is the parking spot for cargo like this giant?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • April 25, 2016 at 3:53 pm
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      Hi Lawrence,
      It is likely to park on a remote bay opposite Terminal 1 International.

      Reply
  • April 26, 2016 at 1:58 pm
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    So exciting for Ukrainians in Perth. 30 of us will get to meet and greet the pilots and crew as well as our newly appointed Ukrainian Ambassador to Australia at the same time.
    We hope to get some interesting pics to upload onto our Hobby Shack Facebook site for all plane enthusiasts in WA.

    Reply
  • April 28, 2016 at 3:20 pm
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    So will Perth Airport be hosting/organizing any type of special viewing area to see this? Where would be the best location to view the arrival? I know of the observation look out at the southern end of the main run way, but what if it lands north to south, probably wouldn’t get much of a good look then from that view point?

    Reply
    • April 28, 2016 at 6:38 pm
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      Hi Brett,
      The Viewing Area is likely to be full to overflowing, as there is a lot of interest in this visit and it will arrive on a Sunday (unless that changes). Some people are coming to Perth from the Eastern States, just to see the An-225.
      When the A350 and A380 first visited Perth, the Viewing Area car park filled up quickly and Perth Airport closed the entrance. Any drivers attempting to park on the road outside were told by airport staff that they would be fined and may have their car towed away.
      I have already contacted Perth Airport about spectator arrangements and am awaiting a response.
      If it lands on the north end, there is a possibility that it will go the full length of the runway before turning off, but that is up top the pilots and air traffic controllers.
      If it lands at the south end, then the Viewing Area would be a good spot to watch it, subject to extra parking being available.

      Reply
  • April 29, 2016 at 7:29 pm
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    I love antonov225

    Reply
  • May 2, 2016 at 9:43 am
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    Hi David .. Do you know if the exact time of arrival is known as yet? How exciting!

    Reply
    • May 2, 2016 at 7:23 pm
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      Hi Amanda,
      Timings are as listed in the article, but subject to change.

      Reply
  • May 3, 2016 at 4:47 pm
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    Hi David,
    Just wondering if there arrival and departure times were to chance, when would a likely time for them to change be, and when would you post the updated times, thanks.

    Reply
    • May 3, 2016 at 5:01 pm
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      Hi Noah,
      The arrival and departure times can change at any time.
      We will post updated times as soon as we are aware.
      There are reports that the departure time from Perth may be slightly delayed to enable spectators to see it leave. No confirmation of this nor any revised ETD yet.

      Reply
  • May 10, 2016 at 10:57 pm
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    For those interested in the actual cargo being carried by the Antonov AN 225 then here is the actual power generator at Brush factory in Pilsen south west of Prague.. Its all wrapped up ready to go on the train to Prague prior to loading . You can see just how heavy it is by the lifting mechanism required to move it..This is why it will take many hours to get it on and off the aircraft from the Antonovs front end. People in T1 international observation deck eastern end should get a view of part of the process on Sunday and Monday as its offloaded.. even as interesting as the plane itself. Just paste this address in a new tab

    http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e27/bigcat2269/CiFE9OaWUAAWwsL_zpsmrmmhmin.jpg?t=1462804984

    Reply
  • May 11, 2016 at 3:21 am
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    Hi everyone from Ukraine) We will be happy, if you see the AN-225

    Reply
  • May 11, 2016 at 1:29 pm
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    Mriya will park right in front of viewing window on level 3 arrivals area of International Terminal 1. Parking in T1 car park. Get there early! Antonov 225 will get the classic water welcome in front of the window. We will be meeting the 7 pilots and then joining them for lunch. Exciting time for Ukrainians in Perth. Yellow and blue colours will be in force – flag colours.

    Reply
    • May 11, 2016 at 5:47 pm
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      Hi Lesa,
      Parking at Terminal 1 can be very expensive. They will also be clearing people out of the Observation Deck in T1 every 30 minutes and queues are expected.
      There is also free parking on that day in two of the Long Term car parks (G and K), which are near the dedicated Antonov Event Zone, near Airport Drive.

      Reply
      • May 12, 2016 at 12:07 pm
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        Hi David,

        We will be getting VIP free passes so not a problem for us but I know many people are viewing this as a once in a lifetime experience and want to park there especially with elderly and children.

        Reply
        • May 12, 2016 at 4:35 pm
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          I agree – was just warning people about the cost and crowds…

          Reply
  • May 11, 2016 at 3:11 pm
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    Hi, do we know what the flight path will be, e.g flying in over Swan Valley or over
    Cannington ? Would be great to see it coming in to land but not competing with crowds !!!
    Thanks

    Reply
    • May 11, 2016 at 5:51 pm
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      They are expecting it to land approaching from the north (over Swan Valley) but it depends on winds.
      The aircraft will land against the wind, as mentioned in the article.
      Suggest you use an app like FlightRadar24 or Planefinder, to see which direction the aircraft are landing.

      Reply
  • May 11, 2016 at 7:15 pm
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    WInds are expected to be southerly on the weekend unlike the last few days when it was north to north west so unless there is a turnaround Mirya will come over Ellenbrook and West Swan Road to land on the northern end of runway 03/21

    Reply
  • May 12, 2016 at 10:36 am
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    When will car park and viewing area open?

    Reply
    • May 12, 2016 at 4:43 pm
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      If you are referring to the Antonov Special Zone near Airport Drive on the south east side of the airport, it will open at 7am. The free parking is nearby at Long Term Car Parks G and K.
      The normal public viewing area will be opening at 7:30am and gates will be closed when it is full.

      Reply
  • May 12, 2016 at 7:11 pm
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    Will there be an opportunity to have a look on the other three days that it is in Perth ? If so where will it be parked?

    Reply
    • May 12, 2016 at 7:52 pm
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      It will be parked opposite the International Terminal on a remote parking bay, so you will be able to see it from the Observation Deck in Terminal 1.

      Reply
  • May 12, 2016 at 11:10 pm
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    Hye and nice to hear that this antonov an225 visited Malaysia..
    may i know the ETA of this flight ??
    Thank you

    Reply
    • May 13, 2016 at 8:42 am
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      It is due into Kuala Lumpur at 3:59AM Kuala Lumpur time – in the darkness sorry!

      Reply
      • May 13, 2016 at 9:04 am
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        Thank you for your reply Mr.David..
        a bit disappointed that it will arrive early in the morning..
        ^-^

        Reply
      • May 13, 2016 at 9:18 am
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        And Mr.David,
        when will it depart from KLIA to the next destination,Perth isn’t it ??

        Reply
        • May 13, 2016 at 10:28 am
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          Departs Kuala Lumpur at 4:30am (KL time), so in darkness unfortunately.

          Reply
  • May 13, 2016 at 3:46 pm
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    Winds look like they May be northerly on Sunday Morning so maybe a good chance for it to land on the southern end of eunway 03/21.That will mean people in the normal outside viewing area and the new special zone on the control tower side will get a great view of the landing.it will probably come over Rottnest and Cockburn and turn over Harris dale coming in over Cannington and Kewdale.will have to watch wind movements early sunday morning to confirm this..should be a good sight for majority of spectators if this is the case.

    Reply
  • May 14, 2016 at 8:04 am
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    About to land at KLIA at 08:30 am this morning. Set to depart for Perth at 04:30am tomorrow

    Reply
  • May 14, 2016 at 4:06 pm
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    Hi David what is the chance it will land from the North

    Reply
    • May 14, 2016 at 4:38 pm
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      Depends on winds. Forecast for 10am Sunday indicates it will land from the north.
      If winds swing more northerly, then that will change.

      Reply
  • May 15, 2016 at 1:46 am
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    Does anyone know if it will be flying anywhere near joondalup? Really wanna see it in the sky but have hurt my back so hoping to view from home?? Will it be traceable on flight radar??

    Reply
    • May 15, 2016 at 6:46 am
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      It should be visible on FlightRadar, but cannot confirm whether it will pass over Joondalup. Current forecast winds indicate landing on north end of runway, but this could change.

      Reply
  • May 15, 2016 at 5:24 pm
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    Hi David
    Any idea idea if takeoff will be easily viewed from the viewing platform? I’ve never watched a/craft takeoff from there before.
    Thanks

    Reply
    • May 15, 2016 at 8:11 pm
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      Hi Anna,
      Unfortunately, the Viewing Area on Dunreath Drive will not open until 7:30AM, which is too late for the 5:30AM departure of the An-225.
      As far as I am aware, Perth Airport has no plans to open the Viewing Area early, but I will ask them. If the weather is good, the only disadvantage will be that you are shooting towards the rising sun.
      The An-225 may actually take off later than 5:30AM, as the engines have to be run up for a while prior to departure.

      Reply
  • May 15, 2016 at 10:11 pm
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    Huge, huge thanks to you for all the info you’ve been posting on this visit, David. Like many others I’m sure, I’m very appreciative indeed of the fantastic updates that’ve been popping up with lots of useful details. Really excellent!

    Reply
    • May 16, 2016 at 5:51 am
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      You’re welcome Mike!
      I wanted to ensure as many people as possible got to learn about and see the massive An-225.
      I wish I could get permission to see it up close!

      Reply
      • May 16, 2016 at 7:51 pm
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        Oh gosh, I thought you would definitely have been one of the privileged few! I hope you still managed to enjoy the day (An-225 and Ed Force One on the same day? Wow!!) from whatever vantage point you had. Hopefully a well-guarded aviationwa.org.au hideout with a marvellous view 🙂

        Reply
        • May 16, 2016 at 9:08 pm
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          I was in Terminal 1 Observation Deck in the media cordon area. It was still an enjoyable day, but it would have been fantastic to be with the media next to the runway when it touched down.
          Our other photographers were at various spots around the airport.

          Reply
  • May 16, 2016 at 9:17 am
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    Pilots actually told us at lunch yesterday that take-off would be at 6.30am Tuesday. They as the Ukrainian Ambassador were especially upset at media reports that the Plane is Russian. It was constructed during the Soviet era but designed and built by Ukrainians. They pointed out the highly developed aeronautics industry in Ukraine. They have all piloted planes to Perth or other parts of Australia before but are very focussed upon “the team” piloting Mriya. I asked if there were any females pilots who had worked on this plane. Sadly no! They asked us to remember the military Ukrainian female pilot still held in Russia. We presented them with a beautiful mounted Boomerang inscripted with greetings from The Ukrainian Association and people of WA, with a message to return as boomerangs must do. I asked that next time they are piloted by a couple of females. Women in Ukraine are highly educated in aeronautics and engineering.
    We had a funny moment taking the senior pilot and one other to their hotel at the end of the day. All day the Antonov and pilots were being photographed and feted, but the tables turned and the pilots all encircled my old Bentley S1 excitedly taking photos of each other sitting in the car and as we departed. We were enthralled by Antonov but they just loved a simple old classic car rarely seen in Ukraine. I should have asked our club members to drive them all separately to their hotel. Next time perhaps.
    Everyone who saw the landing would remember such an amazing event – once in a lifetime for some of us.
    Great to see club members on observation deck.

    Reply
    • May 16, 2016 at 7:08 pm
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      Hi Lesa,
      Our latest update is that departure is Tuesday 17 May 2016, with a 5:30am engine start, 5:40am take-off.
      We did not say that the An-225 was Russian – our article said it was designed and built in Ukraine.
      It was great to see the Ukrainian community and Ambassador enjoying this special event.
      I wish I could have seen the An-225 close-up and met the crew! Maybe next time….

      Reply
  • May 16, 2016 at 10:07 am
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    what time is the An-225 departing Perth.

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    • May 16, 2016 at 6:56 pm
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      Departure is Tuesday 17 May 2016, 5:30am engine start, 5:40am take-off

      Reply
  • May 16, 2016 at 3:34 pm
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    Yes Thank You David, the constant updates were really useful, especially on the day with the delay of the departure from Malaysia. I bet you’ve been busy yourself by the sounds of it you’ve had several media engagements, I heard you on 6PR last week. Surprised you weren’t able to get you’re way onto the VIP area and rub shoulders with Geoffrey Thomas!

    Some of the backlash has been a bit surprising, even within my own family! Blaming spectators for delaying people to get to there flights, I say, they are to blame for not planning properly! They’ve had plenty of notice and the media have been all over it! Today’s article from Brendan Foster on WA Today, is also a bit disheartening, stuff em all, my 3 year old son and I had a ball, even getting up close to a few domestic arrivals and departures was a good prelude to the big event, we had a great time!

    Reply

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